CaSMa at the Corpus Linguistics 2015 Conference

The current general appreciation for cross-disciplinary pollination has long ceased to be a novelty so it will not come as a surprise that CaSMa has found a legitimate reason to join the Corpus Linguistics 2015 conference hosted between 20-24th July 2015 by UCREL (University Centre for Computer Corpus Research on Language) at Lancaster University, UK.

Passion and enthusiasm for the art of words were not dampened despite the fact that the proceedings were sadly held in memory of Professor Geoffrey Leech, the linguist of international calibre around whom both this annual conference and the very UCREL initially coalesced. His memory was fittingly honoured by a rich event, running at all times with four simultaneous, well packed streams spanning a multitude of corpus interests.
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Ethical Standards: Journalism vs Academics. Is it time for universal ethic guidelines?

This week, we are delighted to introduce a guest blog from our CaSMa intern, Levi Rickman! Levi is in the closing stages  of her Psychology degree at Nottingham Trent University, and is currently working with us on Phase II of the “Exploring Academic Attitudes to Social Media Research Ethics” project.

leviWhen I started my Internship with CaSMa a few weeks ago, I had a limited understanding of the ethical issues surrounding social media
research and, therefore, this was the main area for me to focus on. Having studied Psychology for five years, I have grown accustomed to the ethical guidelines that researchers must consider in order to have their projects approved by ethic committees, including informed consent, minimisation of potential harm to participants, and so on. These ethical issues can easily be dealt with when researching individuals in a laboratory setting, but pose a slightly more difficult challenge when trying to apply the same set of codes to research online, and particularly data produced on social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook.

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Web 2.0 labour relations between Content_contributors and Platform_providers

SocialMedia_WorkerStikeMany of the most well known internet platforms and apps such as Facebook, Wikipedia, Reddit, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, LinkedIn, Tumblr, etc. are fundamentally dependent on user generated content. Without it, they have nothing to offer to attract or retain users. On the face of it, this would suggest that the balance of power between the companies running the platforms/apps and the users should skew towards the users.

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Digital Economy Web Science & Big Data Summer School

And now for something a little different…

I am very excited to announce that over the next few days I will be attending the Digital Economy Web Science & Big Data Summer School, held at the University of Southampton! In the words of the University’s Web Science Centre for Doctoral Training, here’s the rationale underpinning the event :

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Can there be a ‘not good, money back’ guarantee when paying with data?

Data_as_money Undoubtedly by now everyone who reads this blog piece will have heard statements like ‘data is the new currency’, or something along the same lines. From a practical lived-experiance perspective the analogies seems obvious. After-all, we pay for software apps and internet services by surrendering private information. It seems the only way to explain the massive stock market valuations of many internet companies.

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Government in court over failure of “duty of care”

Grand_Hall_de_Justice_de_Palais_de_La_Paix_à_La_Haye_Pays-BasOn June 24th a Dutch court sided with environment campaigners, ruling that the state has a “duty of care” for its citizens which requires it to “mitigate as quickly and as much as possible” the risks of climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, regardless of failures to each strong international commitments. What might the implications of such a ruling be for other areas of social-economic policy such as the issues of privacy and citizen rights in the digital economy?

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