Tag Archives: University of Nottingham

Rebooting The Expert, Routes to Policy Impact

Having previously been postponed due to Pre-election period Prudah restriction, the “Rebooting the Expert”  a.k.a. “Routes to Policy Impact” event finally took place on July 6th 2017.

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Nottingham Engaged: Rebooting ‘the Expert’?

The University of Nottingham public engagement and policy impact
conference

Thursday July 6 2017, Jubilee Conference Centre, Jubilee Campus

Agenda
Conference Chair: Alex Miles (Deputy Director for Communications and Advocacy)

0900-0930 Registration and Breakfast

0930-1030 What works in public and policy engagement?
Dr Jenni Chambers (Head of Public Engagement with Research – Research Councils UK)
Mel Knetsch (Strategic lead for Innovation and Interdisciplinarity – ESRC)
Professor Sir Martyn Poliakoff (Research Professor of Chemistry – University of Nottingham)
Dr Michael Scott (Associate Professor and Impact Officer – University of Warwick)
Chloe Sheppard (Researchers’ Engagement Manager – Wellcome Trust)

1030-1130 Nottingham experiences
A series of University of Nottingham academics and professional staff share their experience of policy and public engagement work in rapid-fire ‘pecha-kucha’ style presentations, followed by Q&A

1130-1145 Coffee Break

1145-1230 Rebooting the ‘expert’
Rick Hall (Founder – Ignite Futures Ltd)
Dom McDonald (Head of Education – The Royal Institution)
Sir Alan Meale (MP for Mansfield 1987-2017)
Farai Pfende (Head of Learning and Development – JoCo Learning and Development)
Dr Karen Salt (Co-Director, Centre for Research in Race and Rights – University of Nottingham)

1230-1330 Lunch

1330-1335 Developing impact leaders at Nottingham
Dr Lyndsey Harris (Assistant Professor in Criminology – University of Nottingham)

1335-1400 The future for Nottingham
Professor Dame Jessica Corner (Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research & Knowledge Exchange – University of Nottingham)

1400-1445 Breakout 1 (session options on next page)

1445-1530 Breakout 2 (session options on next page)

1530-1700 BBQ – Networking Opportunity & Doctoral Research Showcase

Breakout 1 – session options

Policy Engagement: where do I start? (Room 5)
Sarah Foxen (Parliamentary Office for Science & Technology)
Irena Hulova (Office of Alex Norris MP)
Professor Sarah Sharples (University of Nottingham)

Public Engagement: why bother? (Room 6)
Dr Jenni Chambers (RCUK)
Dr Susan Anderson (University of Nottingham)

Must do or wise to do? Writing impact and engagement into bids (Room 3)
Mel Knetsch (ESRC)
Dr Sara Goodacre (University of Nottingham)

Schools Engagement: why it matters and what you can do (Room 4)
Jon Rea (Nottingham City Council)
Professor Howard Stevenson (University of Nottingham)

Evaluating to make an impact (Room 2)
Dom McDonald (The Royal Institution)
Steven Hardy (University of Nottingham)

Breakout 2 – session options

Developing PE activity and pathways to impact (Room 6)
Dr Jenni Chambers (RCUK)
Dr Susan Anderson (University of Nottingham)

Presenting with impact: a practical session on public speaking and confidence (Room 5)
Martin Berry (award-winning director for theatre and radio)

Making the media work for you (Room 3)
Dr Denis Schluppeck (University of Nottingham)
Liz Cass (University of Nottingham)

Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology – web resources focus group (Room 4)
Sarah Foxen (Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology)

Participatory research: engaging communities in your projects (Room 2)
Dr Sarah Pierce (University of Nottingham)
Dr Karen Salt (University of Nottingham)

Social media, what is it good for (when used as part of your work)?

Twitter_communicationThe POET (Public Outreach Engagement Tool) project is currently running a second round of interviews to map out how academics at the University of Nottingham are using social media in the context of public engagement, especially in regards to the Impact and Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) agendas. We previously conducted one round of interviews with science researchers, and have held a workshop to think about what the output of this tool could look like. Our project is still at the stage where we are collecting information about how social media is used by academics as part of their working day – to what extent it is used, the feelings associated with using it, whether their motivations for using it are work related, and whether this tool would be useful for any current public engagement work.

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Future scoping attitudes to surveillance in the fight against serious and organized crime

nca_2694881bIn the shadow of the ongoing debate over other Investigative Powers Bill, a debate where much of the rhetoric has been predominantly framed in terms of anti-terrorism and national-security, the National Crime Agency is currently busy with its own internal ‘future scoping’ exercise to examine the UK law enforcement community’s efforts regarding interceptions of communications and associated data. At the heart of this exercise is the question of identifying the boundaries of acceptability of such communications interceptions that delimits ‘policing by consent’ in the fight against serious and organized crime in a democratic society.

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Twitter tool workshop (POET project)

TwitterWorkshopOn Monday 7 December we ran a half-day workshop as part of the POET (Public Outreach Engagement Tool) project. For this workshop we invited Twitter using academics, students and administrative staff (e.g. University communications unit; Library  support) to join us for some brainstorming sessions around the features that a tool should have in order to help to optimise the effectiveness of public engagement through Twitter. The outcomes of this workshop will feed directly into the design of a Twitter tool that is currently being developed at Horizon Digital Economy Research.

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Twitter POET (Public Outreach Evaluation Tool) workshop

As part of two Horizon Digital Economy Research projects (CaSMa & CREATe) we are developing a tool to help Twitter users measure and improve the impact of their social media activity.

This is a half-day workshop to get input from Twitter users regarding the features that you would look for in a tool to help you to optimise the effectiveness of your public engagement through Twitter. The outcomes of this workshop will feed directly into the design of a Twitter tool that is currently being developed at Horizon Digital Economy Research.

Date: Monday December 7th
Time: 9:15 to 12:00am
Place: room B2, Hemsley, Park Campus

Agenda:

  • 9:15-9:30 Welcome
  • 9:30-9:45 Summary of findings from an interview study we previously conducted regarding Twitter use by academics
  • 9:45-10:15 Brainstorming of features for a Public Outreach Evaluation Tool
  • 10:15-10:30 Presentation of brainstorming results
  • 10:30-10:45 Break
  • 10:45-11:00 Demonstration of the current stage of our Twitter analysis tool
  • 11:00-11:30 Brainstorming of features for a Public Outreach Evaluation Tool
  • 11:30-11:45 Presentation of brainstorming results
  • 11:45-12:00 Information/invitation for future interviews and/or Twitter data analysis studies.

Please e-mail me at ansgar.koene_at_nottingham.ac.uk to sign up before November 30th, so that we can estimate the number of attendees.

It’s not personal, it’s strictly business: The use of Twitter in academia

Twitter_-_What_are_you_doing-This week we have a guest post by Penny Polson, who has been a Research Assistant on the POET tool for the past three months. Penny has been building on the qualitative analysis skills she attained in her dissertation project (regarding attitudes regarding fish pain) to investigate the experiences of academics who use social media. In this blog, she focuses on the important distinction made between ‘personal’ and ‘professional’ use of Twitter accounts, and how those terms become blurred once public engagement and specifically Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) are considered.

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iRights Youth Juries

iReight_goup

On April 9th the first two iRights Youth Juries were held at University of Nottingham. In collaboration with the civil society initiative, iRights, and Prof. Coleman’s lab from University of Leeds, CaSMa will be running 12 Youth Juries to allow children and young people to have a say about their rights on the internet. At the Youth Juries groups of 10 to 15 participants, aged 12-17, are asked to consider, debate and share ideas about the future of the internet.

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iRights Nottingham Youth Juries

What are the iRights Youth Juries?
The iRights Youth Juries are special events to allow children and young people to have a say about their rights on the internet. At the Youth Juries participants will be asked to consider, debate and share ideas about the future of the internet.

What are they aiming to achieve?
The results of the Youth Juries will feed into a major national report, which will be published by iRights in collaboration with The University of Leeds and The University of Nottingham (CaSMa). The report will provide evidence about young people’s views on the future of the internet and their rights online and will feed into future policy by government, industry and academic networks as a part of the wider iRights campaign to highlight the importance of young people’s rights on the internet.

Who can take part?
The Youth Juries are open to young people aged 12-17 years from a wide range of backgrounds and areas. Each Youth Jury will be attended by a group of 10-15 young people. Participants don’t need to have any experience or qualifications to take part.

What can I expect at the Youth Jury?
The Youth Jury will be highly interactive and will feature actors and scenarios as a way of sparking debate. It will be fun and engaging, and will allow the space for everyone to put their opinions across. Participants will be asked to complete a short survey at the beginning and end of each jury session’

iReight_YJ

Ethics for Business & Personal Data

CaSMa is please to invite regional SMEs to our first interactive workshop on Business and Data Ethics in the digitally connected world.

After an initial general discussion of Ethics and the importance of ethical business practices, the workshop will focus on questions relating to ethical practices when dealing with business and customer data. Special attention will be paid to considering the perspective of the customer, or business relation, when thinking about how to handle data relating to them.

Workshop Programme

14:00                     Arrival and registration

14:05                     Session 1: Business Ethics
Facilitated by Dr Elvira Perez Vallejos and Ramona Statache

  1. Ice breaker… what do we already know?
  2. Ethics, Morals and Ethical codes in SMEs
  3. Benefit of Business Ethics

14:45                     Coffee break

15:00                    Session 2: Data Ethics
Facilitated by Dr Ansgar Koene

  1. Business Ethics vs Data Ethics
  2. Four Areas of Tension Regarding Data
  3. Best Practice Guide: What to consider when faced with data

15:45                     Summing up and evaluation

16:00                     Close

This workshop is part of the Ingenuity Workshops series that is run by the University of Nottingham Business Engagement and Innovation Services