Tag Archives: Surveillance

Connected Life 2016: Collective Action & The Internet

Connected Life 2016 is a two-day student-run conference dedicated to sparking exchange between disciplines and showcasing emerging Internet research. Bringing together participants from across the humanities, social sciences, and physical sciences, Connected Life seeks to foster collaborations within and beyond Oxford in pursuit of an enhanced understanding of the Internet and its multifaceted effects.

Connected Life is held at the Faculty of Classics on day 1 and Balliol College on day 2 (University of Oxford), and supported by the Balliol Interdisciplinary Institute and the ESRC.

BANNER2

The theme for this year is Collective Action and the Internet. The Conference explores how the Internet affects collective action; both in big social movements, such as the Arab Spring and the Hong Kong Protests, and in more everyday forms of collaboration. Though other social science research relating to the Internet is most welcome as well

Conference programme is here.

Convention 108: from a European reality to a global treaty

countic_of_EuropeThe International Conference held in Strasbourg on 17 June 2016 gathered over a hundred participants, from more than 60 countries, to notably welcome the accession of Mauritius to Convention 108.

Mauritius will become the 49th country to join the Convention. Other will follow soon and the unique forum of exchange and cooperation offered by the Committee of the Convention will continue to expand, and gather more and more countries from all regions of the world.

You missed the event ? Regrettable indeed,  but here are some of the highlights of the day :

  • Relying on the importance of the Convention, Giovanni Buttarelli, European Data Protection Supervisor, encouraged to “make Convention 108 principles digital and not to water them down”
  • Karolina Mojzesowicz from the European Commission recalled that “Convention was the source, the mother of the European EU data protection rules” and that it “was and will remain the key compass in the European and global privacy legal landscape”
  • Graham Greenleaf from UNSW Australia spotted the visual spread of Convention 108 : out of the 110 countries in the world with data protection laws, nearly half of them are already members of Convention 108!
  • Marc Rotenberg from EPIC recalled how his organization has been calling for the US accession to the Convention and how as part of the 2016 political campaign, it called on people running for public office in the US to support accession as a “common framework, based on law and fundamental rights, is an absolutely essential requirement for our digital age”
  • Joseph Cannataci, UN Special Rapporteur on the right to Privacy, recalled that the “Council of Europe spent more than 25 years providing a lead”. So much of a lead that the European Union took it on.

Finally, the Conference also witnessed the deposit of the ratification instrument of Mauritius by Drudeisha Madhub, Privacy Commissioner and the signature of a cooperation agreement between the Data Protection Authorities of Belgium and Tunisia.

Presentations and speeches:

EDPS civil society summit

The EDPS (European Data Protection Supervisor) met with civil society organisations to discuss the state of data protection and privacy in the EU. On the agenda this year was the implementation of the GDPR and the directive on data protection rules for the police and criminal justice, the review of the ePrivacy Directive, and developments in case law in the last 12 months, notably Schrems v. Data Protection Commissioner and the proposed Privacy Shield agreement.

The meeting took place at the EDPS premises in Brussels from 9.30am-12.30pm. If you have any questions, please write to us at edps@edps.europa.eu with ‘2016 EDPS- Civil Society Summit’ in the subject line, and we will send you further details about the event. The videos of the event are available here.

Follow #EDPSCivSoc2016 and stay tuned!

The programme of the meeting is available here.

The slides of the presentations that were given are linked below:

Implementation of GDPR: consistency, flexibility, guidelines, presentation by Anna Fielder, Privacy International

The e-Privacy Directive: what’s at stake?, presentation by Prof. Ian Brown, University of Oxford

Necessity and proportionality, presentation by Ralf Bendrath, German Working Group on Data Retention and Digitale Gesellschaft

EDRi analysis on the most dangerous flexibilities allowed by the General Data Protection Regulation

E-Privacy revision: an analysis from civil society groups

EuroDIG 2016

EuroDIG2016From June 8th to 10th we attended EuroDIG 2016, the annual Pan-European Dialogue on Internet Governance conference that was held in Brussels this year.

Continue reading EuroDIG 2016

EuroDIG 2016

The Pan-European dialogue on Internet governance (EuroDIG) is an open platform for informal and inclusive discussions on public policy issues related to Internet Governance (IG). 

Exchanging views and best practices

The European Dialogue on Internet Governance (EuroDIG) is an open multi-stakeholder platform to exchange views about the Internet and how it is governed. Created in 2008 by several organisations, government representatives and experts, it fosters dialogue and collaboration with the Internet community on public policy for the Internet. Culminating in an annual conference that takes place in a different capital city, EuroDIG ‘messages’ are prepared and presented to the UN-led Internet Governance Forum.

EuroDIG is supported by a group of institutional partners, namely the Council of Europe, the European Commission, the European Regional At-Large Organization (EURALO), the European Broadcasting Union (EBU), the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the Internet Society (ISOC), the Federal Office of Communications of Switzerland (OFCOM) and the Ré- seaux IP Européens Network Coordination Centre (RIPE NCC).

The main aim of EuroDIG is to promote the engagement of Europeans in multistakeholder dialogue in order to share their expertise and best practice and, where possible, identify common ground. This enables EuroDIG to pull together national perspectives and to apply and shape European values and views regarding the Internet.

The programme overview is available here.

Future scoping attitudes to surveillance in the fight against serious and organized crime

nca_2694881bIn the shadow of the ongoing debate over other Investigative Powers Bill, a debate where much of the rhetoric has been predominantly framed in terms of anti-terrorism and national-security, the National Crime Agency is currently busy with its own internal ‘future scoping’ exercise to examine the UK law enforcement community’s efforts regarding interceptions of communications and associated data. At the heart of this exercise is the question of identifying the boundaries of acceptability of such communications interceptions that delimits ‘policing by consent’ in the fight against serious and organized crime in a democratic society.

Continue reading Future scoping attitudes to surveillance in the fight against serious and organized crime

Human Rights and Technology. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

UPeaceThe United Nations mandated University for Peace (UPEACE) recently launched a call for papers to contribute to an e-book “that examines how the uses of current technologies, and the development of new ones, can contribute to guarantee and protect human rights within the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development framework. Hence, considering that every Sustainable Development Goal aims to protect one or more human rights, and that states will rely on the use of technological innovations and global interconnectedness to implement the 2030 Agenda, we are looking for articles that explore one or more of the following topics:

Continue reading Human Rights and Technology. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

The Privatization of Human Rights: Illusions of Consent, Automation and Neutrality

CIGI_coverWhile exploring the Internet And Human Rights Resources Center at the Internet Society, I encountered a highly informative report from the Global Commission on Internet Governance (CIGI), which was published in January 2016, on the extent to which the management of individuals’ fundamental rights, e.g. privacy and free speech, is in the hands corporations.

The report presents an excellent overview of the various ways in which the dominance of a small set of companies that control the web platforms where most people spend the majority of their time online has produced a situation where these companies have become major actors in determining the state of human rights online.

Continue reading The Privatization of Human Rights: Illusions of Consent, Automation and Neutrality

Analysis of the draft Investigatory Powers Bill (part 2)

IPB

Continuation from part 1

One of the much vaunted features of the IPB by the Home Secretary is the so called ‘double lock’ provided by the requirement that the Judicial Commissioner has to sign off on any warrant in order for it to take effect. So what do we know about the position of the Judicial Commissioner, and how they will be appointed?

Continue reading Analysis of the draft Investigatory Powers Bill (part 2)

Analysis of the draft Investigatory Powers Bill (part 1)

IPBThe draft Investigatory Powers Bill (IPB) is a proposed new law on surveillance that was presented to parliament in November 2015. The bill is currently before the Joint Committee (i.e. both Houses of Parliament) which is investigating the content of the bill and will report its recommendations to the Houses in February 2016. The first step of the procedure having been a call for written evidence, which had to be submitted by 21 December 2015, as well as public hearings in November, December 2015 and January 2016. Since the IPB has obvious implications for privacy and digital rights, I decided to take a closer look at the Bill (despite it being 299 pages long).

Continue reading Analysis of the draft Investigatory Powers Bill (part 1)