Tag Archives: social media

Data Privacy Day 2017

January 28th was Data Privacy Day. With all the news and messages calling for your attention you may well have missed it since very few media organizations mentioned it this year. Here is a selection of activities that caught our eye:

Continue reading Data Privacy Day 2017

Announcement: 5Rights Youth Juries report launch at Parliament

The UnBias team is pleased to announce the launch of a ground-breaking report that articulates the voice of children and young people, and their relationship to the internet and digital technologies.

The launch will take place at the House of Lords next 31st of January and it be presented by Baroness Beeban Kidron, Prof Stephen Coleman from Leeds University and Elvira Perez from the UnBias team. Children and young people will be attending the launch and contributing the Q&A session.

Mural created at the Web We Want Festival

This report is titled ‘The Internet on our Own Term: How Children and Young People Deliberated about their Digital Rights’ and describes the work carried since April 2015 in which young people aged between 12 and 17 gathered together in the cities of Leeds, London and Nottingham to participate in a series of jury-styled focus groups designed to ‘put the internet on trial’. In total, nine juries took place which included 108 young people, approximately 12 participants per jury.

Continue reading Announcement: 5Rights Youth Juries report launch at Parliament

2016 UK Internet Governance Forum

2016 UK Internet Governance Forum

The programme for the 2016 UK-IGF, to be held on 17 November at One Drummond Gate, will include the sessions set out below. Further topics and speakers will be confirmed shortly and this page will be updated. In the meantime you can submit your views on what you would like to see discussed at the event. You can also keep up to date by following @UKIGF on Twitter.

If you are interested in attending, please sign up today.

Sessions

The global policy landscape

Former culture minister Rt Hon Ed Vaizey MP (@edvaizey) will give a short address on the changing global policy landscape.  What does the result of the US Presidential election and the increasingly assertive stances of Russia and China mean for the free and open internet?

Brexit: what next for UK internet policy?

Five months after the EU referendum, TechUK’s Charlotte Holloway (@CharlotteHollo) will lead a discussion on the practical and philosophical impacts of Brexit for the internet sector.  Can the UK maintain its influence on internet governance outside of the EU?

e-Identification: The future of privacy?

The rise of new forms of electronic identification potential offers improved security and easier access to public and private services. Access Partnership’s Matthew McDermott (@AccessAlerts) will be leading a workshop to consider how can we make sure these are secure and interoperable, and what might be the killer app to drive adoption?

What is the impact of the internet on political debate?

With political debate across the West apparently becoming more polarised, we will be asking has the internet empowered more people to engage in politics, widened our horizons, or simply made us more entrenched in our particular world-view?

A panel including NationBuilder’s Toni Cowan-Brown (@ToniCowanBrown) and Demos’ Carl Miller (@carljackmiller) will consider these questions and whether internet companies have a role to play in widening people’s exposure to other points of view?

The UK’s cyber-preparedness: In conversation with Anthony Finkelstein

With the number of high profile cyber-attacks targeting UK and international businesses rising on a weekly basis, we will hear from UCL’s Professor Anthony Finkelstein (@profserious) the UK’s Chief Scientific Adviser for National Security.

 Preparation for the global IGF

Global Partner Digital’s Andrew Puddephatt (@AndrewPuddephat) and the LSE’s David Souter (@DavidNSouter) will lead a round-up of the headlines from the day’s discussions and look ahead to the global IGF in December.

If you have any questions about the event or require any further information please contact info@ukigf.org.uk.

MAPPING Project FP7: Second General Assembly

Online business, Security and Fundamental Human Rights – Enabling trust on the Internet

The MAPPING project consortium is looking forward to the next meeting of invited stakeholders, interested in debating the existing innovation policies, business models and legal framework related to three major, interrelated focus areas: Internet governance, Privacy, Intellectual property rights.

After the success of the First General Assembly in Hanover in September 2015, in the Prague 2016 General Assembly we expect the continuation of the dialogue with key experts and policy and decision makers, who are involved in research and innovation in the above mentioned areas within Europe’s political, social and economic context.

Following recommendations from the participants of previous General Assemblies, the event in Prague will take place over three full days.

Keeping Social Media – a new video from our colleagues at Digital Wildfires

Our colleagues on the Digital Wildfires project teamed up with Oxford Sparks and Jason R.C. Nurse to produce a new video animation for young people about the joys and challenges of social media information. In the words of the Digital Wildfires team: “Keeping Social Media depicts the ways that social media have revolutionised the ways we communicate. Whiles these platforms open up an unimagined volume of ideas and possibilities they also offer anonymity, which increases the chance that both children and adults may take risks and experiment with behaviours they may not consider offline. Our video describes how research can help find ways to tackle some of the challenges posed by social media and invites the viewer to consider how these digital social spaces should be regulated.”

Submission to House of Lords inquiry on “Children and the Internet”

imagevaulthandler-aspxBuilding on the results from our work on the iRights Youth Juries, CaSMa responded to the call for evidence from the to House of Lords Communications Committee “Children and the Internet” inquiry. Following our submission at the end of August, Professor Derek McAuley was invited to give verbal evidence, which took place on October 11th [transcript] [video].

Continue reading Submission to House of Lords inquiry on “Children and the Internet”

Data for Policy 2016: Frontiers of Data Science for Government – Ideas, Practices and Projections

Data Science is emerging as a key interdisciplinary research field to address major contemporary challenges across sectors. Particular focus on the government sector offers huge potentials to advance citizen services and collective decision-making processes. To reflect the diversity of skills and knowledge required to tackle challenges in this domain, the conference offers an open discussion forum for all stakeholders. We invite individual and/or group submissions from all relevant disciplines and application domains. Topics covered include but are not limited to the following:

  • Government & Policy: Digital era governance and citizen services, public demand vs. government response, using data in the policy process, open source and open data movements, policy laboratories, citizen expertise for government, public opinion and participation in democratic processes, distributed data bases and data streams, information and evidence in policy context, case studies and best practices.
  • Policy for Data & Management: Data collection, storage, and access; psychology/behaviour of decision; privacy, trust, public rights, free speech, ethics and law; data security/ownership/linkage; provenance, curation, expiration; private/public sector/non-profit collaboration and partnership, etc.
  • Data Analysis: Computational procedures for data collection, storage, and access; large-scale data processing, dealing with biased/imperfect/uncertain data, human interaction with data, statistical/computational models, technical challenges, communicating results, visualisation, etc.
  • Methodologies: Qualitative/quantitative/mixed methods, gaps in theory and practice, secondary data analysis, web scraping, randomised controlled trials, sentiment analysis, Bayesian approaches and graphical models, biologically inspired models, real-time and historical data processing, simulation and modeling, small area estimation, correlation & causality based models, and other relevant methods.
  • Data Sources: Government administrative data, official statistics, commercial and non-profit data, user-generated web content (blogs, wikis, discussion forums, posts, chats, tweets, podcasting, pins, digital images, video, audio files, advertisements, etc.), search engine data, data gathered by connected people and devices (e.g. wearable technology, mobile devices, Internet of Things), tracking data (including GPS/geolocation data, traffic and other transport sensor data, CCTV images etc.,), satellite and aerial imagery, and other relevant data sources.
  • Policy/Application Domains: Security, health, cities, public administration, economy, science and innovation, finance, energy, environment, social policy areas (education, migration, etc.) and other relevant domains.

Data for Policy 2016 Conference Programme is available here!

Social Media platforms, Algorithm tools & Editorial responsibility

EditorialResponsibilityOn Tuesday August 30th (2016), it was reported that the German government had asked Facebook to remove hateful and illegal posts more quickly, as part of its corporate social responsibility. Social Media companies however are typically reluctant to be very proactive in their approach to such removal, preferring to rely on notifications from the users, because they do not want to be seen to edit the content that is shared since this might lead to them being labelled a publisher. The moment a social media company becomes a publisher it would become liable to media regulations and open to libel laws. This was also the position that Zuckerberg reaffirmed one day earlier during a Q&A in Italy where he said: “No, we’re a tech company, we’re not a media company,” Facebook builds “the tools, we do not produce any of the content.”

Continue reading Social Media platforms, Algorithm tools & Editorial responsibility

Social media, what is it good for (when used as part of your work)?

Twitter_communicationThe POET (Public Outreach Engagement Tool) project is currently running a second round of interviews to map out how academics at the University of Nottingham are using social media in the context of public engagement, especially in regards to the Impact and Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) agendas. We previously conducted one round of interviews with science researchers, and have held a workshop to think about what the output of this tool could look like. Our project is still at the stage where we are collecting information about how social media is used by academics as part of their working day – to what extent it is used, the feelings associated with using it, whether their motivations for using it are work related, and whether this tool would be useful for any current public engagement work.

Continue reading Social media, what is it good for (when used as part of your work)?