Tag Archives: social justice

Privacy, Personality and Flows of Information

A workshop conference co-organised by the mandate of the Special Rapporteur for Privacy (SRP) together with Human Rights Watch, Global Freedom of Expression Columbia University, the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University Law Center, The Department of Information Policy & Governance at the University of Malta and Security, Technology & e-Privacy Research Group at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. This workshop is the first public event co-organised by the SRP aimed at achieving a better understanding of privacy.

Full information about the invitation to this event is available at the UN SRP’s blog. This also includes a link to the agenda of the workshop.

Connected Life 2016: Collective Action & The Internet

Connected Life 2016 is a two-day student-run conference dedicated to sparking exchange between disciplines and showcasing emerging Internet research. Bringing together participants from across the humanities, social sciences, and physical sciences, Connected Life seeks to foster collaborations within and beyond Oxford in pursuit of an enhanced understanding of the Internet and its multifaceted effects.

Connected Life is held at the Faculty of Classics on day 1 and Balliol College on day 2 (University of Oxford), and supported by the Balliol Interdisciplinary Institute and the ESRC.

BANNER2

The theme for this year is Collective Action and the Internet. The Conference explores how the Internet affects collective action; both in big social movements, such as the Arab Spring and the Hong Kong Protests, and in more everyday forms of collaboration. Though other social science research relating to the Internet is most welcome as well

Conference programme is here.

The Voiceless Generation: What does youth civic engagement look like in the digital age?

This Youth Civic and Political Engagement Workshop forms part of a collaboration between Horizon’s CaSMa and Gada aimed at developing social media tools to support grass-roots driven civic engagement campaigns to achieve tangible policy impact.
The purpose of this workshop is to explore definitions and understanding around what youth civic engagement is (and also what is not), what motivates young people to engage and how to reach out to those whose voice is not being heard.
In order to address these questions we invited participants from:
  • City council
  • National parliament outreach
  • Regional & national civic NGOs
  • Political/activist student societies
  • Interested students
In preparation for the workshop participating groups were asked to prepare a short presentation on:
1. What do you do? (aspects of your professional role that may be relevant to youth civic engagement)
2. How do you seek to promote youth engagement?
3. What challenges do you face?

Event programme
10:30 – 11:00 Welcome, registration and opening survey
11:00 – 11:15 Ice-breaker
11:15 – 11:40 What do we understand by civic engagement?
Introductory Video
Aims and objectives of the event
What is civic engagement? Some background information
What is civic engagement? Examples from participants
Adopting a definition
11:40 – 12.10 Focus groups: motives, barriers and facilitators of     youth civic engagement
Breaking into focus groups and choosing rapporteurs
Focus group discuss key issues/questions
12:10 – 12:20 Coffee break
12:20 – 12:35 Rapporteurs present findings
12:35 – 12-55 Wrap-up session
Discussing the findings
What have we learnt?
What do we do next?
12:55 – 13:00 Closing survey
13:00 – 14:00 Lunch and networking at Trent Cafe

#DASTS16 Interpellating Future(s), the biennale Danish conference on STS

“It could have been different” is the quintessential anti-determinist and anti-essentialist mantra of STS. This mantra is a simultaneous reflection on being and becoming, a concern with the past, present and the future. It is a mantra that implicates a care of the possible.

The concern with future(s) is unprecedented and ranges across all scales. Climate change; financial technologies – ‘futures’ – allowing investment on presumptions; and gene tests for diagnosing (the probability) of ailments to appear later in life, are but a few evident examples. Predicting, forecasting, foresighting future(s) is an inextricable part of the present and the role of science and technology in the production as well as the anticipation of the future(s), is paramount. Arguably for the first time in centuries the future looks gloomy, rather than bright.

A concern with future(s) is central to the field of STS. When future(s) are made – not given – as suggested above, how they are made becomes a central and painstaking concern. What constitutes the practices and sociotechnical arrangements of future making? What future(s) follows from our current arrangements, infrastructures and ways of engaging? What diagnosis of the present – what nature(s) – does specific future making practices rest upon? And when future(s) are not entirely up to us and escapes us continuously, how are we disposed? The DASTS 2016 conference committee invites the Danish STS research milieu to engage with the practices of future(s) and future making.

The conference committee invites participants, paper abstracts and track proposals concerned with, but not limited to, future(s). The spirit of the conference is as always inclusive and exploratory. The conference welcomes contributions from scholars at all academic levels that consider themselves affiliated with STS to share and discuss their work. DASTS 2016 is a biennial conference of the Danish Association for Science, Technology and Society Studies.

Thursday the 2nd

9:00-10:00 Registration
10:00-11:00 Keynote by Isabelle Stengers
11:00-12:30 Parallel sessions
Publics, politics and participation – Part I – Room 091
Introducing STS and social work – Part I – Room 184
Technologies of the self – Part I – Room 192
12:30-13:30 Lunch
13:30-14:30 DASTS General Assembly
14:30-14:45 Tea & Coffee
14:45-16:15 Parallel sessions
Fabricating STS – Room 091
Introducing STS and social work – Part II – Room 184
Technologies of the self – Part II – Room 192
17:00-19:00 Future Lecture by Bruno Latour (registration closed but livestreamed here)
19:30-? Conference dinner at FrüdNo16.

Friday the 3rd

9:30-10:30 Keynote by Nikolas Rose
10:30-12:00 Parallel sessions
Publics, politics and participation – Part II – Room 091
Dreams for the Future – Part I – Room 184
Exploring data driven governance assemblages – Part I – Room 192
12:00-13:00 Lunch
13:00-15:00 Parallel sessions
Research practices and knowledge creation – Room 091
Dreams for the Future – Part II – Room 184
Exploring data driven governance assemblages – Part II – Room 192
15:00-15:30 Tea & Coffee
15:30-16:59 Parallel sessions
Anticipation, Scenario Planning & STS – Room 091
Dreams for the Future – Part III – Room 184
Future Making – Room 192

Human Rights and Technology. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

UPeaceThe United Nations mandated University for Peace (UPEACE) recently launched a call for papers to contribute to an e-book “that examines how the uses of current technologies, and the development of new ones, can contribute to guarantee and protect human rights within the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development framework. Hence, considering that every Sustainable Development Goal aims to protect one or more human rights, and that states will rely on the use of technological innovations and global interconnectedness to implement the 2030 Agenda, we are looking for articles that explore one or more of the following topics:

Continue reading Human Rights and Technology. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Digital Transformations of Work Conference

As part of the Green Templeton College Future of Work Programme the Oxford Internet Institute are bringing together leading researchers to consider the ways in which digitalisation and the internet are globally transforming work, employment and labour markets.

This one-day conference features:

Further details including the conference program are available here.

iRight Youth Juries: Promoting Digital Rights

child judgecorp_civilcourt Three-quarters of British adults are concerned over unauthorised access to their private information online. Parents in particular are becoming highly concerned about the challenges, risks and consequences that social media usage, cyberbullying, data privacy and online behaviour may have on users, especially children and young people. Much debate is now contemplating the possibility of re-balancing the power between citizens, government and corporations to ensure that civic and human rights in the physical word also apply in the digital one. To explore these issues and promote digital literacy among the general population, the CaSMa research team presents an innovative format to bring people together and facilitate reflection on digital rights. During the event, the audience will watch a short movie and be invited to become part of a ‘jury’ that will discuss: – What are digital rights? – What should potential and possible digital rights be? – Ways in which digital rights (or their absence) can affect us. – Ways of further engaging with the general population in thinking about and acting upon digital rights. This ‘jury’ approach is similar to a focus group, but one in which participants have an explicit objective of arriving at specific recommendations, thereby promoting a sense of responsibility amongst the group, and enhancing discussion. Once the participants have had an opportunity to engage with the issues of digital rights, and experience the ‘jury’ based method, they will be presented with research outcomes from a project which used this method with children and young people, called iRights Youth Juries. There will then be ample opportunity to discuss the findings with our research team. The jury brings an engaging element to the ESRC Festival and an effective tool to facilitate discussion, reflection and learning on digital rights. By becoming part of a jury, participants will experience first-hand this research method and further understand connections between drama education and digital education. We will promote the event to the general public through our proposed venue, Galleries of Justice, through local media and city council events listings, the CaSMa project website: http://casma.wp.horizon.ac.uk/, and our network of stakeholder partners including iRights.

To register for the event, go to: http://irightsyouthjuries.eventbrite.co.uk

Web We Want festival

The third edition of the Web We Want festival organized by the Web We Want movement will again be held at the Southbank Centre in London.

This time the festival will include two contributions from the iRights Youth Juries project that CaSMa is collaborating on with the iRights initiative.

– Sunday June 30th, Web We Wan Bites: Prof. Stephen Coleman will present a brief summary and video of the iRights Youth Juries.

– Sunday June 30th, iRights Workshop: Discussion and brain-storming event to help the Southbank Centre Digital Team design the website to incorporate the principles of the iRights as part of their efforts at making the Southbank Centre website a world class destination.

Internet.org, affordable internet access at what cost?

internet.org

Internet.org is a Facebook-led initiative bringing together technology leaders, non-profits and local communities to connect the two thirds of the world that doesn’t have Internet access.’ Continue reading Internet.org, affordable internet access at what cost?