Tag Archives: reputation

Announcement: 5Rights Youth Juries report launch at Parliament

The UnBias team is pleased to announce the launch of a ground-breaking report that articulates the voice of children and young people, and their relationship to the internet and digital technologies.

The launch will take place at the House of Lords next 31st of January and it be presented by Baroness Beeban Kidron, Prof Stephen Coleman from Leeds University and Elvira Perez from the UnBias team. Children and young people will be attending the launch and contributing the Q&A session.

Mural created at the Web We Want Festival

This report is titled ‘The Internet on our Own Term: How Children and Young People Deliberated about their Digital Rights’ and describes the work carried since April 2015 in which young people aged between 12 and 17 gathered together in the cities of Leeds, London and Nottingham to participate in a series of jury-styled focus groups designed to ‘put the internet on trial’. In total, nine juries took place which included 108 young people, approximately 12 participants per jury.

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Keeping Social Media – a new video from our colleagues at Digital Wildfires

Our colleagues on the Digital Wildfires project teamed up with Oxford Sparks and Jason R.C. Nurse to produce a new video animation for young people about the joys and challenges of social media information. In the words of the Digital Wildfires team: “Keeping Social Media depicts the ways that social media have revolutionised the ways we communicate. Whiles these platforms open up an unimagined volume of ideas and possibilities they also offer anonymity, which increases the chance that both children and adults may take risks and experiment with behaviours they may not consider offline. Our video describes how research can help find ways to tackle some of the challenges posed by social media and invites the viewer to consider how these digital social spaces should be regulated.”

CaSMa in the Conversation: Never read the terms and conditions? Here’s an idea that might protect your online privacy

Conversation_kitemarks_articleHave you ever actually read the terms and conditions before signing up to a website or ordering something online? These long, wordy documents are a form of consumer protection designed to make sure we are fully informed when we agree to an online contract. They are supposed to ensure we are making a conscious decision to sign up to a service with full knowledge of the consequences.

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Guest post for Digital Wildfires: #TakeCareOfYourDigitalSelf

DigitalWildfiresYoung people are a highly vulnerable group on social media. Current research (summarised here https://www.nspcc.org.uk/services-and-resources/research-and-resources/2015/how-safe-are-our-children-2015/ ) suggests that 1 in 3 have been victims of cyber bullying and 1 in 4 have experienced something upsetting on a social media site. The ‘Digital Wildfire’ project (www.digitalwildfire.org) explores the spread of provocative and antagonistic content on social media and seeks to identify opportunities for the responsible governance of digital social spaces. As part of this we have spent time engaging with young people and school teachers to find out their views on social media and the harms it can cause.

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iRight Youth Juries: Promoting Digital Rights

child judgecorp_civilcourt Three-quarters of British adults are concerned over unauthorised access to their private information online. Parents in particular are becoming highly concerned about the challenges, risks and consequences that social media usage, cyberbullying, data privacy and online behaviour may have on users, especially children and young people. Much debate is now contemplating the possibility of re-balancing the power between citizens, government and corporations to ensure that civic and human rights in the physical word also apply in the digital one. To explore these issues and promote digital literacy among the general population, the CaSMa research team presents an innovative format to bring people together and facilitate reflection on digital rights. During the event, the audience will watch a short movie and be invited to become part of a ‘jury’ that will discuss: – What are digital rights? – What should potential and possible digital rights be? – Ways in which digital rights (or their absence) can affect us. – Ways of further engaging with the general population in thinking about and acting upon digital rights. This ‘jury’ approach is similar to a focus group, but one in which participants have an explicit objective of arriving at specific recommendations, thereby promoting a sense of responsibility amongst the group, and enhancing discussion. Once the participants have had an opportunity to engage with the issues of digital rights, and experience the ‘jury’ based method, they will be presented with research outcomes from a project which used this method with children and young people, called iRights Youth Juries. There will then be ample opportunity to discuss the findings with our research team. The jury brings an engaging element to the ESRC Festival and an effective tool to facilitate discussion, reflection and learning on digital rights. By becoming part of a jury, participants will experience first-hand this research method and further understand connections between drama education and digital education. We will promote the event to the general public through our proposed venue, Galleries of Justice, through local media and city council events listings, the CaSMa project website: http://casma.wp.horizon.ac.uk/, and our network of stakeholder partners including iRights.

To register for the event, go to: http://irightsyouthjuries.eventbrite.co.uk

iRights Youth Juries

iReight_goup

On April 9th the first two iRights Youth Juries were held at University of Nottingham. In collaboration with the civil society initiative, iRights, and Prof. Coleman’s lab from University of Leeds, CaSMa will be running 12 Youth Juries to allow children and young people to have a say about their rights on the internet. At the Youth Juries groups of 10 to 15 participants, aged 12-17, are asked to consider, debate and share ideas about the future of the internet.

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From Social Media Research, to Researchers & Social Media

IMG_0182This week saw a slight shift in focus for one member of the CaSMa team, as Chris went out to speak to doctoral students about how social media can be used not only as a promising site for academic research, but to raise the profile of their work and professional reputation as researchers.

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