Tag Archives: Policy

Submission on behalf of RRI researchers to Commons Sci-Tech Select Committee inquiry on remit of the interim chair of UKRI

rri_wordcloudOn Friday 23 September I attended a workshop on “RRI in the UK: the post Brexit future?” that was organized by Prof. Bernd Stahl (DeMontford U.) to discuss with UK researchers engaged with the Responsible Research and Innovation agenda how the current state of RRI in the UK, and where the research field might head next. One of the stated aims of the workshop was to “look to develop a strategy/roadmap, which enables all UK academics working in this field to feel that there is a way forward” [if/when EU funding for RRI is no longer available post-Brexit].

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Policy Summit – What’s working to foster digital growth

We believe that the digital economy holds enormous opportunities for businesses and societies in Europe, but also poses challenges in areas such as job automation and the impact of the sharing economy. Readie’s Digital Policy Summit in partnership with the Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung takes place on 11 October in Berlin.

Together, delegates from national governments will share practical insights and investigate existing high-quality policies that have the potential to:

  • provide opportunities for entrepreneurs to start up new digital businesses;
  • enable existing businesses to scale using digital technology;
  • create digital growth across Europe which is inclusive and sustainable.

RRI in the UK: the post BREXIT future?

We would like to invite you to a day workshop to discuss the current state of RRI in the UK, and where the research field might head next. We are looking to develop a strategy/roadmap, which enables all UK academics working in this field to feel that there is a way forward. Therefore, we envisage that this will be an open and interactive discussion, that will allow participants to co-design the agenda and therefore the outcomes.

Venue

University College London (UCL)

Who Should Attend?

  • People doing research directly on and with RRI
  • Researchers interested in topics connected to RRI
  • Research funders and policy makers who recognise the significance of RRI

Why you should attend

  • Contribute to the building of an RRI community in the UK
  • Contribute to the discussion over the future of RRI funding in the UK
  • Shape the future strategy for research policy in RRI
  • Develop strategies to embed the UK RRI community within the wider global context

Therefore, in this workshop we ask you to join us with the aim to discuss 2 fundamental questions:

  • Where next for RRI research and funding, post-Brexit and the proposed exit from the European frameworks?
  • What, as a network of RRI interested organisations in the UK, can we do together to shape the RRI landscape, in particular over the next 2 to 5 years?

Draft Agenda

09.30-10.00 Registration & coffee

10.00-10.15 Welcome

10.15-11.15 Keynote: The relevance of Brexit to RRI in the UK and beyond – Richard Owen, University of Exeter

11:15-13:00 Breakout groups: Causes and consequences of Brexit

13.00-14.00 Buffet lunch

14.00-15.30 Open Space session: ideas for future action

15.30-15.45 Break

15.45-16.00 Plenary & way forward

16.00 End

This event is jointly organised by the STS Department of UCL and the Centre for Computing and Social Responsibility of De Montfort University. It is supported by the RRI-Tools and Responsible-Industry projects.

Data for Policy 2016: Frontiers of Data Science for Government – Ideas, Practices and Projections

Data Science is emerging as a key interdisciplinary research field to address major contemporary challenges across sectors. Particular focus on the government sector offers huge potentials to advance citizen services and collective decision-making processes. To reflect the diversity of skills and knowledge required to tackle challenges in this domain, the conference offers an open discussion forum for all stakeholders. We invite individual and/or group submissions from all relevant disciplines and application domains. Topics covered include but are not limited to the following:

  • Government & Policy: Digital era governance and citizen services, public demand vs. government response, using data in the policy process, open source and open data movements, policy laboratories, citizen expertise for government, public opinion and participation in democratic processes, distributed data bases and data streams, information and evidence in policy context, case studies and best practices.
  • Policy for Data & Management: Data collection, storage, and access; psychology/behaviour of decision; privacy, trust, public rights, free speech, ethics and law; data security/ownership/linkage; provenance, curation, expiration; private/public sector/non-profit collaboration and partnership, etc.
  • Data Analysis: Computational procedures for data collection, storage, and access; large-scale data processing, dealing with biased/imperfect/uncertain data, human interaction with data, statistical/computational models, technical challenges, communicating results, visualisation, etc.
  • Methodologies: Qualitative/quantitative/mixed methods, gaps in theory and practice, secondary data analysis, web scraping, randomised controlled trials, sentiment analysis, Bayesian approaches and graphical models, biologically inspired models, real-time and historical data processing, simulation and modeling, small area estimation, correlation & causality based models, and other relevant methods.
  • Data Sources: Government administrative data, official statistics, commercial and non-profit data, user-generated web content (blogs, wikis, discussion forums, posts, chats, tweets, podcasting, pins, digital images, video, audio files, advertisements, etc.), search engine data, data gathered by connected people and devices (e.g. wearable technology, mobile devices, Internet of Things), tracking data (including GPS/geolocation data, traffic and other transport sensor data, CCTV images etc.,), satellite and aerial imagery, and other relevant data sources.
  • Policy/Application Domains: Security, health, cities, public administration, economy, science and innovation, finance, energy, environment, social policy areas (education, migration, etc.) and other relevant domains.

Data for Policy 2016 Conference Programme is available here!

Social Media platforms, Algorithm tools & Editorial responsibility

EditorialResponsibilityOn Tuesday August 30th (2016), it was reported that the German government had asked Facebook to remove hateful and illegal posts more quickly, as part of its corporate social responsibility. Social Media companies however are typically reluctant to be very proactive in their approach to such removal, preferring to rely on notifications from the users, because they do not want to be seen to edit the content that is shared since this might lead to them being labelled a publisher. The moment a social media company becomes a publisher it would become liable to media regulations and open to libel laws. This was also the position that Zuckerberg reaffirmed one day earlier during a Q&A in Italy where he said: “No, we’re a tech company, we’re not a media company,” Facebook builds “the tools, we do not produce any of the content.”

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When AI goes to War: youth opinion, modern conflict, and autonomous weapons

robot 2Weaponisation of artificial intelligence (AI) presents one of the greatest ethical and technological challenges in the 21st century and has been described as the third revolution in warfare, after the invention of gunpowder and nuclear weapons. Despite the vital importance of this development for modern society, legal and ethical practices, and technological turning point, there is little systematic study of public opinion on this critical issue. This interdisciplinary project addresses this gap. Our objective is to analyse what factors determine public attitudes towards the use of fully autonomous weapons. To do this, we put the public at the center of the policy debate, starting with youth engagement in political and decision-making processes.

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CaSMa in the Conversation: Never read the terms and conditions? Here’s an idea that might protect your online privacy

Conversation_kitemarks_articleHave you ever actually read the terms and conditions before signing up to a website or ordering something online? These long, wordy documents are a form of consumer protection designed to make sure we are fully informed when we agree to an online contract. They are supposed to ensure we are making a conscious decision to sign up to a service with full knowledge of the consequences.

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Privacy, Personality and Flows of Information

A workshop conference co-organised by the mandate of the Special Rapporteur for Privacy (SRP) together with Human Rights Watch, Global Freedom of Expression Columbia University, the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University Law Center, The Department of Information Policy & Governance at the University of Malta and Security, Technology & e-Privacy Research Group at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. This workshop is the first public event co-organised by the SRP aimed at achieving a better understanding of privacy.

Full information about the invitation to this event is available at the UN SRP’s blog. This also includes a link to the agenda of the workshop.