Tag Archives: Internet or Things

2016 UK Internet Governance Forum

2016 UK Internet Governance Forum

The programme for the 2016 UK-IGF, to be held on 17 November at One Drummond Gate, will include the sessions set out below. Further topics and speakers will be confirmed shortly and this page will be updated. In the meantime you can submit your views on what you would like to see discussed at the event. You can also keep up to date by following @UKIGF on Twitter.

If you are interested in attending, please sign up today.

Sessions

The global policy landscape

Former culture minister Rt Hon Ed Vaizey MP (@edvaizey) will give a short address on the changing global policy landscape.  What does the result of the US Presidential election and the increasingly assertive stances of Russia and China mean for the free and open internet?

Brexit: what next for UK internet policy?

Five months after the EU referendum, TechUK’s Charlotte Holloway (@CharlotteHollo) will lead a discussion on the practical and philosophical impacts of Brexit for the internet sector.  Can the UK maintain its influence on internet governance outside of the EU?

e-Identification: The future of privacy?

The rise of new forms of electronic identification potential offers improved security and easier access to public and private services. Access Partnership’s Matthew McDermott (@AccessAlerts) will be leading a workshop to consider how can we make sure these are secure and interoperable, and what might be the killer app to drive adoption?

What is the impact of the internet on political debate?

With political debate across the West apparently becoming more polarised, we will be asking has the internet empowered more people to engage in politics, widened our horizons, or simply made us more entrenched in our particular world-view?

A panel including NationBuilder’s Toni Cowan-Brown (@ToniCowanBrown) and Demos’ Carl Miller (@carljackmiller) will consider these questions and whether internet companies have a role to play in widening people’s exposure to other points of view?

The UK’s cyber-preparedness: In conversation with Anthony Finkelstein

With the number of high profile cyber-attacks targeting UK and international businesses rising on a weekly basis, we will hear from UCL’s Professor Anthony Finkelstein (@profserious) the UK’s Chief Scientific Adviser for National Security.

 Preparation for the global IGF

Global Partner Digital’s Andrew Puddephatt (@AndrewPuddephat) and the LSE’s David Souter (@DavidNSouter) will lead a round-up of the headlines from the day’s discussions and look ahead to the global IGF in December.

If you have any questions about the event or require any further information please contact info@ukigf.org.uk.

MAPPING Project FP7: Second General Assembly

Online business, Security and Fundamental Human Rights – Enabling trust on the Internet

The MAPPING project consortium is looking forward to the next meeting of invited stakeholders, interested in debating the existing innovation policies, business models and legal framework related to three major, interrelated focus areas: Internet governance, Privacy, Intellectual property rights.

After the success of the First General Assembly in Hanover in September 2015, in the Prague 2016 General Assembly we expect the continuation of the dialogue with key experts and policy and decision makers, who are involved in research and innovation in the above mentioned areas within Europe’s political, social and economic context.

Following recommendations from the participants of previous General Assemblies, the event in Prague will take place over three full days.

In the Conversation: “Could your kettle bring down the internet?”

page-shot-2016-10-25-could-your-kettle-bring-down-the-internet_On Friday 21st October a botnet of hacked Internet or Things devices launched a massive DDoS attack on a DNS service provider causing major disruption to services like PayPal, Twitter and Netflix. To many security experts familiar with IoT it was only matter of time before this would happen. Assuming that this will act as a wakeup call, what can be done to improve IoT cybersecurity?

Our Conversation article “Could your kettle bring down the internet?” lists some suggestions.

 

Policy Summit – What’s working to foster digital growth

We believe that the digital economy holds enormous opportunities for businesses and societies in Europe, but also poses challenges in areas such as job automation and the impact of the sharing economy. Readie’s Digital Policy Summit in partnership with the Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung takes place on 11 October in Berlin.

Together, delegates from national governments will share practical insights and investigate existing high-quality policies that have the potential to:

  • provide opportunities for entrepreneurs to start up new digital businesses;
  • enable existing businesses to scale using digital technology;
  • create digital growth across Europe which is inclusive and sustainable.

Privacy, Personality and Flows of Information

A workshop conference co-organised by the mandate of the Special Rapporteur for Privacy (SRP) together with Human Rights Watch, Global Freedom of Expression Columbia University, the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University Law Center, The Department of Information Policy & Governance at the University of Malta and Security, Technology & e-Privacy Research Group at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. This workshop is the first public event co-organised by the SRP aimed at achieving a better understanding of privacy.

Full information about the invitation to this event is available at the UN SRP’s blog. This also includes a link to the agenda of the workshop.

EuroDIG 2016

EuroDIG2016From June 8th to 10th we attended EuroDIG 2016, the annual Pan-European Dialogue on Internet Governance conference that was held in Brussels this year.

Continue reading EuroDIG 2016

EuroDIG 2016

The Pan-European dialogue on Internet governance (EuroDIG) is an open platform for informal and inclusive discussions on public policy issues related to Internet Governance (IG). 

Exchanging views and best practices

The European Dialogue on Internet Governance (EuroDIG) is an open multi-stakeholder platform to exchange views about the Internet and how it is governed. Created in 2008 by several organisations, government representatives and experts, it fosters dialogue and collaboration with the Internet community on public policy for the Internet. Culminating in an annual conference that takes place in a different capital city, EuroDIG ‘messages’ are prepared and presented to the UN-led Internet Governance Forum.

EuroDIG is supported by a group of institutional partners, namely the Council of Europe, the European Commission, the European Regional At-Large Organization (EURALO), the European Broadcasting Union (EBU), the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the Internet Society (ISOC), the Federal Office of Communications of Switzerland (OFCOM) and the Ré- seaux IP Européens Network Coordination Centre (RIPE NCC).

The main aim of EuroDIG is to promote the engagement of Europeans in multistakeholder dialogue in order to share their expertise and best practice and, where possible, identify common ground. This enables EuroDIG to pull together national perspectives and to apply and shape European values and views regarding the Internet.

The programme overview is available here.

#DASTS16 Interpellating Future(s), the biennale Danish conference on STS

“It could have been different” is the quintessential anti-determinist and anti-essentialist mantra of STS. This mantra is a simultaneous reflection on being and becoming, a concern with the past, present and the future. It is a mantra that implicates a care of the possible.

The concern with future(s) is unprecedented and ranges across all scales. Climate change; financial technologies – ‘futures’ – allowing investment on presumptions; and gene tests for diagnosing (the probability) of ailments to appear later in life, are but a few evident examples. Predicting, forecasting, foresighting future(s) is an inextricable part of the present and the role of science and technology in the production as well as the anticipation of the future(s), is paramount. Arguably for the first time in centuries the future looks gloomy, rather than bright.

A concern with future(s) is central to the field of STS. When future(s) are made – not given – as suggested above, how they are made becomes a central and painstaking concern. What constitutes the practices and sociotechnical arrangements of future making? What future(s) follows from our current arrangements, infrastructures and ways of engaging? What diagnosis of the present – what nature(s) – does specific future making practices rest upon? And when future(s) are not entirely up to us and escapes us continuously, how are we disposed? The DASTS 2016 conference committee invites the Danish STS research milieu to engage with the practices of future(s) and future making.

The conference committee invites participants, paper abstracts and track proposals concerned with, but not limited to, future(s). The spirit of the conference is as always inclusive and exploratory. The conference welcomes contributions from scholars at all academic levels that consider themselves affiliated with STS to share and discuss their work. DASTS 2016 is a biennial conference of the Danish Association for Science, Technology and Society Studies.

Thursday the 2nd

9:00-10:00 Registration
10:00-11:00 Keynote by Isabelle Stengers
11:00-12:30 Parallel sessions
Publics, politics and participation – Part I – Room 091
Introducing STS and social work – Part I – Room 184
Technologies of the self – Part I – Room 192
12:30-13:30 Lunch
13:30-14:30 DASTS General Assembly
14:30-14:45 Tea & Coffee
14:45-16:15 Parallel sessions
Fabricating STS – Room 091
Introducing STS and social work – Part II – Room 184
Technologies of the self – Part II – Room 192
17:00-19:00 Future Lecture by Bruno Latour (registration closed but livestreamed here)
19:30-? Conference dinner at FrüdNo16.

Friday the 3rd

9:30-10:30 Keynote by Nikolas Rose
10:30-12:00 Parallel sessions
Publics, politics and participation – Part II – Room 091
Dreams for the Future – Part I – Room 184
Exploring data driven governance assemblages – Part I – Room 192
12:00-13:00 Lunch
13:00-15:00 Parallel sessions
Research practices and knowledge creation – Room 091
Dreams for the Future – Part II – Room 184
Exploring data driven governance assemblages – Part II – Room 192
15:00-15:30 Tea & Coffee
15:30-16:59 Parallel sessions
Anticipation, Scenario Planning & STS – Room 091
Dreams for the Future – Part III – Room 184
Future Making – Room 192

Readie Research Summit – What drives Europe’s digital economy

Policy and business leaders are urgently trying to understand how digital technologies are changing Europe’s economy. How can digitalisation be turned into an opportunity for businesses and entrepreneurs? What cutting-edge research currently exists? And critically, how can researchers, businesses and policy-makers collaborate to set Europe’s Digital Economy on the right course?

Nesta’s European Research Alliance for Digital Economy “Readie” organized this Research Summit as an event to network and hear from the most influential experts on the subject including:

Robin Chase, Founder of Zipcar and Veniam
Dane Stangler, Vice President of Research and Policy, Kauffman Foundation
Enrico Giovannini, member of the Club of Rome
Nicklas Lundblad, Head of EMEA Public Policy and Government Relations at Google
Claire Tansley, EPSRC Senior Portfolio Manager at RCUK
Irene Lopez de Vallejo, Director R&D at the Digital Catapult
Diane Coyle, Professor of Economics, University of Manchester
Ivo Spigel, Co-Founder and Contributing Editor, Tech.eu
Viktor Mayer-Schönberger, Professor of Internet Governance and Regulation, Oxford Internet Institute

Delegates will have the unique opportunity to:
• Hear from leading thinkers about the key trends affecting Europe’s Digital Economy
• Explore new datasets and big data methods to analyse the Digital Economy in real-time
• Join the experts on each panel to contribute your insights, experiences and top questions
• Hear from funders about upcoming research priorities
• Network with businesses to explore partnerships that generate actionable evidence
• Meet researchers from across Europe to forge new collaborations
• Translate their work into impact at Readie’s ‘policy hack’

This Research Summit brings together leading researchers, policy professionals and businesses with an interest in cutting-edge evidence, big data methods, entrepreneurship, innovation and economic growth. It is organised by Readie, Europe’s Research Alliance for a Digital Economy. Our partners include Nesta, Google, rkw, Nemode and Greenwich University.

A Storify summary of the event has been published.

iRight Youth Juries: Promoting Digital Rights

child judgecorp_civilcourt Three-quarters of British adults are concerned over unauthorised access to their private information online. Parents in particular are becoming highly concerned about the challenges, risks and consequences that social media usage, cyberbullying, data privacy and online behaviour may have on users, especially children and young people. Much debate is now contemplating the possibility of re-balancing the power between citizens, government and corporations to ensure that civic and human rights in the physical word also apply in the digital one. To explore these issues and promote digital literacy among the general population, the CaSMa research team presents an innovative format to bring people together and facilitate reflection on digital rights. During the event, the audience will watch a short movie and be invited to become part of a ‘jury’ that will discuss: – What are digital rights? – What should potential and possible digital rights be? – Ways in which digital rights (or their absence) can affect us. – Ways of further engaging with the general population in thinking about and acting upon digital rights. This ‘jury’ approach is similar to a focus group, but one in which participants have an explicit objective of arriving at specific recommendations, thereby promoting a sense of responsibility amongst the group, and enhancing discussion. Once the participants have had an opportunity to engage with the issues of digital rights, and experience the ‘jury’ based method, they will be presented with research outcomes from a project which used this method with children and young people, called iRights Youth Juries. There will then be ample opportunity to discuss the findings with our research team. The jury brings an engaging element to the ESRC Festival and an effective tool to facilitate discussion, reflection and learning on digital rights. By becoming part of a jury, participants will experience first-hand this research method and further understand connections between drama education and digital education. We will promote the event to the general public through our proposed venue, Galleries of Justice, through local media and city council events listings, the CaSMa project website: http://casma.wp.horizon.ac.uk/, and our network of stakeholder partners including iRights.

To register for the event, go to: http://irightsyouthjuries.eventbrite.co.uk