Tag Archives: Facebook

EuroDIG 2016

The Pan-European dialogue on Internet governance (EuroDIG) is an open platform for informal and inclusive discussions on public policy issues related to Internet Governance (IG). 

Exchanging views and best practices

The European Dialogue on Internet Governance (EuroDIG) is an open multi-stakeholder platform to exchange views about the Internet and how it is governed. Created in 2008 by several organisations, government representatives and experts, it fosters dialogue and collaboration with the Internet community on public policy for the Internet. Culminating in an annual conference that takes place in a different capital city, EuroDIG ‘messages’ are prepared and presented to the UN-led Internet Governance Forum.

EuroDIG is supported by a group of institutional partners, namely the Council of Europe, the European Commission, the European Regional At-Large Organization (EURALO), the European Broadcasting Union (EBU), the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the Internet Society (ISOC), the Federal Office of Communications of Switzerland (OFCOM) and the Ré- seaux IP Européens Network Coordination Centre (RIPE NCC).

The main aim of EuroDIG is to promote the engagement of Europeans in multistakeholder dialogue in order to share their expertise and best practice and, where possible, identify common ground. This enables EuroDIG to pull together national perspectives and to apply and shape European values and views regarding the Internet.

The programme overview is available here.

iRight Youth Juries: Promoting Digital Rights

child judgecorp_civilcourt Three-quarters of British adults are concerned over unauthorised access to their private information online. Parents in particular are becoming highly concerned about the challenges, risks and consequences that social media usage, cyberbullying, data privacy and online behaviour may have on users, especially children and young people. Much debate is now contemplating the possibility of re-balancing the power between citizens, government and corporations to ensure that civic and human rights in the physical word also apply in the digital one. To explore these issues and promote digital literacy among the general population, the CaSMa research team presents an innovative format to bring people together and facilitate reflection on digital rights. During the event, the audience will watch a short movie and be invited to become part of a ‘jury’ that will discuss: – What are digital rights? – What should potential and possible digital rights be? – Ways in which digital rights (or their absence) can affect us. – Ways of further engaging with the general population in thinking about and acting upon digital rights. This ‘jury’ approach is similar to a focus group, but one in which participants have an explicit objective of arriving at specific recommendations, thereby promoting a sense of responsibility amongst the group, and enhancing discussion. Once the participants have had an opportunity to engage with the issues of digital rights, and experience the ‘jury’ based method, they will be presented with research outcomes from a project which used this method with children and young people, called iRights Youth Juries. There will then be ample opportunity to discuss the findings with our research team. The jury brings an engaging element to the ESRC Festival and an effective tool to facilitate discussion, reflection and learning on digital rights. By becoming part of a jury, participants will experience first-hand this research method and further understand connections between drama education and digital education. We will promote the event to the general public through our proposed venue, Galleries of Justice, through local media and city council events listings, the CaSMa project website: http://casma.wp.horizon.ac.uk/, and our network of stakeholder partners including iRights.

To register for the event, go to: http://irightsyouthjuries.eventbrite.co.uk

House of Lords vs. Algorithm Overlords!

Lords_v_AIAs a researcher who has spent some time working on AI and Robotics I naturally tend to notice when AI gets discussed in the news. Over the last couple of years, social media and software companies have all started to invest heavily in AI research such as Google’s purchase of the robotics company Boston Dynamics, Facebook, as well as Microsoft, Apple and IBM’s Watson and Deep Blue of course. Partially in response to this, research institutes (e.g. Future of Life institute, Future of Humanity institute, Machine Intelligence Research Institute (MIRI)) and well known scientists and industrialists (e.g. Stephen Hawking, Max Tegmark, Elon Musk and Bill Gates) have launched various campaigns and given media interviews to raise their concerns about the possible extinction level threat posed by the possible rise of Superintelligent AI.

Continue reading House of Lords vs. Algorithm Overlords!

Dial Facebook ‘M’ for …

Dial_MThis week Facebook launched its bid for capturing and building the market in personal digital assistant services (for now only available to select groups of people in San Francisco). Facebook’s ‘M‘ interacts with the user via the Facebook Messenger app, but as with the competitors Siri (Apple), Now (Google), Cortana (Microsoft) and Echo (Amazon), the serious work is done through cloud services.

Continue reading Dial Facebook ‘M’ for …

Web 2.0 labour relations between Content_contributors and Platform_providers

SocialMedia_WorkerStikeMany of the most well known internet platforms and apps such as Facebook, Wikipedia, Reddit, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, LinkedIn, Tumblr, etc. are fundamentally dependent on user generated content. Without it, they have nothing to offer to attract or retain users. On the face of it, this would suggest that the balance of power between the companies running the platforms/apps and the users should skew towards the users.

Continue reading Web 2.0 labour relations between Content_contributors and Platform_providers

CaSMa in The Conversation: Most of us don’t read the social media small print – and it’s a data goldmine for third parties

image-20150615-5816-5huim1The history of human experiments often focuses on biomedical research and the gradual changes in acceptable practice and ethical considerations. But another class of human experiments that has had its own share of controversies is the study of human behaviour.

Internet Mediate Human Behaviour Research (IMHBR) is primarily defined by its use of the internet to obtain data about participants. While some of the research involves active participation with research subjects directly engaging with the research, for example through online surveys or experimental tasks, many studies take advantage of “found text” in blogs, discussion forums or other online spaces, analyses of hits on websites, or observation of other types of online activity such as search engine histories or logs of actions in online games.

Continue reading CaSMa in The Conversation: Most of us don’t read the social media small print – and it’s a data goldmine for third parties

Hidden costs of personalized information services?

RecommenderSystemPersonalized information filtering by online search engines, social media, news sites and retailers represents a natural evolution in the development towards ever more finely tuned interaction with the users. Since the internet provides an overwhelming quantity of information on most topics, information overload has become one of the main concerns for users. Perceived quality of information services is therefore strongly determined by the ease with which the user can obtain some information that satisfies their current desires. For many of the most highly success internet service, like Google, Amazon.com, YouTube, Netflix and TripAdvisor, the recommender system is a key element in their success over rival services in the same sector. Some, like Netflix, openly acknowledge this even to the extent of awarding large prizes for anyone that can improve their recommender system.

Continue reading Hidden costs of personalized information services?

Internet.org, affordable internet access at what cost?

internet.org

Internet.org is a Facebook-led initiative bringing together technology leaders, non-profits and local communities to connect the two thirds of the world that doesn’t have Internet access.’ Continue reading Internet.org, affordable internet access at what cost?