Tag Archives: EU

Responsible Governance for Healthy and Sustainable Smart Platforms: Policy directions for the collaborative economy

Smart online platforms will be a vital enabler of future economic growth across the EU and a key component of  the EU single digital market. They also promise new ways to pool and mobilise society’s resources with the potential to address various impending social and environmental crises.

However, to reap these benefits, new thinking is required around the regulation and governance of smart online platforms to ensure balanced interests, and to promote fair and safe forms of participation, particularly relating to the role played by algorithms and data in driving economies of scale.

This policy event will provide a forum to address the following questions:

  • What are the challenges and opportunities for public policy of Smart Online Platforms?
  • How can we leverage platforms for a more equal, just, and knowledgeable society?
  • How can platforms play a role in reducing the social divide and retain hard-won rights and protections?
  • What  are the challenges and opportunities for existing industries from their disruptive business models?
  • How should the regulatory environment change and what new regulatory institutions or instruments may be needed?
  • How can these technologies support public objectives and help policy makers deliver solutions at greater scale and of greater impact?

This event is being organised by the Smart Society EU FET project which has been exploring technologies and governance models for the next generation of Smart Platforms. The event will include the launch of the Smart Society Social Charter, and high-profile keynote talks.

Preliminary Agenda

 9.30 - 10.00 Registration

10.00 - 10.45 Keynote:The landscape of the collaborative economy, Helen Goulden (Nesta)

10.45 - 11.30 Keynote: Responsibility in Collaborative Economies (TBC)

11.30 - 12.00 Coffee

12.00 - 13.00 A Social Charter for Smart Platforms

13.00 - 13.30 Questions and Discussion

13.30 - 14.30 Lunch

14.30 - 15.15 Panel Session 

15.15 - 16.00 Closing plenary session

MAPPING Project FP7: Second General Assembly

Online business, Security and Fundamental Human Rights – Enabling trust on the Internet

The MAPPING project consortium is looking forward to the next meeting of invited stakeholders, interested in debating the existing innovation policies, business models and legal framework related to three major, interrelated focus areas: Internet governance, Privacy, Intellectual property rights.

After the success of the First General Assembly in Hanover in September 2015, in the Prague 2016 General Assembly we expect the continuation of the dialogue with key experts and policy and decision makers, who are involved in research and innovation in the above mentioned areas within Europe’s political, social and economic context.

Following recommendations from the participants of previous General Assemblies, the event in Prague will take place over three full days.

RRI in the UK: the post BREXIT future?

We would like to invite you to a day workshop to discuss the current state of RRI in the UK, and where the research field might head next. We are looking to develop a strategy/roadmap, which enables all UK academics working in this field to feel that there is a way forward. Therefore, we envisage that this will be an open and interactive discussion, that will allow participants to co-design the agenda and therefore the outcomes.

Venue

University College London (UCL)

Who Should Attend?

  • People doing research directly on and with RRI
  • Researchers interested in topics connected to RRI
  • Research funders and policy makers who recognise the significance of RRI

Why you should attend

  • Contribute to the building of an RRI community in the UK
  • Contribute to the discussion over the future of RRI funding in the UK
  • Shape the future strategy for research policy in RRI
  • Develop strategies to embed the UK RRI community within the wider global context

Therefore, in this workshop we ask you to join us with the aim to discuss 2 fundamental questions:

  • Where next for RRI research and funding, post-Brexit and the proposed exit from the European frameworks?
  • What, as a network of RRI interested organisations in the UK, can we do together to shape the RRI landscape, in particular over the next 2 to 5 years?

Draft Agenda

09.30-10.00 Registration & coffee

10.00-10.15 Welcome

10.15-11.15 Keynote: The relevance of Brexit to RRI in the UK and beyond – Richard Owen, University of Exeter

11:15-13:00 Breakout groups: Causes and consequences of Brexit

13.00-14.00 Buffet lunch

14.00-15.30 Open Space session: ideas for future action

15.30-15.45 Break

15.45-16.00 Plenary & way forward

16.00 End

This event is jointly organised by the STS Department of UCL and the Centre for Computing and Social Responsibility of De Montfort University. It is supported by the RRI-Tools and Responsible-Industry projects.

Made in the EU with GDPR inside!

Qwant“Made in the EU with GDPR inside”, will this be the new label to look for when seeking a quality online service with reliable privacy guarantees?

On 27 April 2016 the EU General Data Protection Regulation (the GDPR) was passed and will come into effect on May 25th 2018. Despite various messages from national data protection authorities (e.g. the ICO) and the EU directorate general in charge of internet, DG Connect urging companies not to wait until the last minute to make sure their services are compliant, many are still not sure what exactly a GDPR compliant Terms of Service or Privacy policy might look like.

Continue reading Made in the EU with GDPR inside!

EDPS Civil Society Summit

EDPS_new_logoOn June 16th we joined civil society organizations like Privacy International, the European Digital Rights association EDRi and various others for a half-day civil society summit organized by the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS). On the agenda were a brief overview of the “Big Issues in Privacy and Data Protection in 2016” by Joe MCNamee of EDRi followed by three one-hour sessions on “Implementation of the GDPR, consistency, flexibility, guidelines” introduced by Anna Fielder (Privacy International); “Reform of e-Privacy Directive: What’s at stake?” introduced by Prof. Ian Brown (Oxford Internet Institute); and “Necessity and proportionality and data protection” introduced by Ralf Bendrath (German Working Group on Data Retention and Digitale Gesellschaft).

Continue reading EDPS Civil Society Summit

EDPS civil society summit

The EDPS (European Data Protection Supervisor) met with civil society organisations to discuss the state of data protection and privacy in the EU. On the agenda this year was the implementation of the GDPR and the directive on data protection rules for the police and criminal justice, the review of the ePrivacy Directive, and developments in case law in the last 12 months, notably Schrems v. Data Protection Commissioner and the proposed Privacy Shield agreement.

The meeting took place at the EDPS premises in Brussels from 9.30am-12.30pm. If you have any questions, please write to us at edps@edps.europa.eu with ‘2016 EDPS- Civil Society Summit’ in the subject line, and we will send you further details about the event. The videos of the event are available here.

Follow #EDPSCivSoc2016 and stay tuned!

The programme of the meeting is available here.

The slides of the presentations that were given are linked below:

Implementation of GDPR: consistency, flexibility, guidelines, presentation by Anna Fielder, Privacy International

The e-Privacy Directive: what’s at stake?, presentation by Prof. Ian Brown, University of Oxford

Necessity and proportionality, presentation by Ralf Bendrath, German Working Group on Data Retention and Digitale Gesellschaft

EDRi analysis on the most dangerous flexibilities allowed by the General Data Protection Regulation

E-Privacy revision: an analysis from civil society groups

EuroDIG 2016

EuroDIG2016From June 8th to 10th we attended EuroDIG 2016, the annual Pan-European Dialogue on Internet Governance conference that was held in Brussels this year.

Continue reading EuroDIG 2016

EuroDIG 2016

The Pan-European dialogue on Internet governance (EuroDIG) is an open platform for informal and inclusive discussions on public policy issues related to Internet Governance (IG). 

Exchanging views and best practices

The European Dialogue on Internet Governance (EuroDIG) is an open multi-stakeholder platform to exchange views about the Internet and how it is governed. Created in 2008 by several organisations, government representatives and experts, it fosters dialogue and collaboration with the Internet community on public policy for the Internet. Culminating in an annual conference that takes place in a different capital city, EuroDIG ‘messages’ are prepared and presented to the UN-led Internet Governance Forum.

EuroDIG is supported by a group of institutional partners, namely the Council of Europe, the European Commission, the European Regional At-Large Organization (EURALO), the European Broadcasting Union (EBU), the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the Internet Society (ISOC), the Federal Office of Communications of Switzerland (OFCOM) and the Ré- seaux IP Européens Network Coordination Centre (RIPE NCC).

The main aim of EuroDIG is to promote the engagement of Europeans in multistakeholder dialogue in order to share their expertise and best practice and, where possible, identify common ground. This enables EuroDIG to pull together national perspectives and to apply and shape European values and views regarding the Internet.

The programme overview is available here.

Are Privacy Shield/Kitemarks the solution for transparent Terms & Conditions?

ICO-urges-firms-to-get-privacy-sealsAt the heart of current online consumer protection is the concept of informed consent where by the prospective consumer makes a conscious decision to sign up to a service with full knowledge and consent to the consequences of doing so. Even in the newly signed EU General Data Protection Regulation, which will go into effect in 2018, this will not fundamentally change. For anyone who has ever used a commercial internet service however, and this included policy makers, it is glaringly obvious that there is a fundamental flaw in this approach, namely the assumption that the consumer has a good understanding of the contract that is being entered into.

Continue reading Are Privacy Shield/Kitemarks the solution for transparent Terms & Conditions?