Tag Archives: Elvira Perez Vallejos

SOCIAL MEDIA ANALYSIS AND MENTAL HEALTH: Putting people at the centre of human data

During this one-day workshop event special focus will be given to the ethics of personal data in both theory and practice and how social medial data (small data) can be accessed and analysed to:

  1. Understand the ways people use social media and what this means for individuals and society.
  2. Understand social phenomena and events expressed in social media by drawing upon social media as a critical, and timely, source of information.
  3. Develop facilities and approaches that are sensitive to the personal nature of human data: Citizen centric approaches.
  4. Promote responsible innovation in the capture, analysis and use of human data.

Programme

9.25-9.30 Dr Elvira Perez (University of Nottingham) – Welcome/Introduction
9.30-10.15 Dr Jens Binder (Nottingham Trent University) – Title: “Self-report does not equal self-report: Levels of personalisation of data in social media research”
10.15-11.00 Professor Karen Douglas (University of Kent) – Title: ‘The social psychology of social media: Individuals, groups and society’

11.00-11.15 Refreshments break

11.15-12.00 Dr Ilka Gleibs (London School of Economics) – Title:‘Turning Virtual Public Spaces into Laboratories:Thoughts on Conducting Online Field Studies UsingSocial Network Site’
12.15-1300 Professor Monica Whitty (University of Leicester) – Title: ‘Collection of Big Data: Re-thinking issues around informed consent’

13.00-1400 Lunch break

14.00-15.00 Parallel sessions
Workshop A. Social Media access and analysis: Citizen centric approaches (Room A07) facilitated by Ansgar Koere (Senior Research Fellow at CaSMa)

Workshop B. Ethics of personal data: Consent, anonymity issues, privacy and trust (Room A06) facilitated by Victoria Betton, (mHealth Programme Director) and Elvira Perez (Senior Research at CaSMa)

15.00-15.15 Refreshments break

15.15- 16.15 Parallel sessions
Workshop A. Social Media access and analysis: Citizen centric approaches (Room A07) facilitated by Ansgar Koere (Senior Research Fellow at CaSMa)

Workshop B. Ethics of personal data: Consent, anonymity issues, privacy and trust (Room A06) facilitated by Victoria Betton, (mHealth Programme Director) and Elvira Perez (Senior Research at CaSMa)

16.15-16.30 Closure

To sign up for the workshop, follow this link to Eventbrite.

Lessons to be learned from the Samaritans Radar turmoil

Samaritans Radar

Learning from the mistakes of others is perhaps one of the most valuable lessons that the Samaritans Radar has offered to research communities concerned about privacy issues and the ethical treatment of social media data, from collection through to analysis.

Continue reading Lessons to be learned from the Samaritans Radar turmoil

Web We Want festival

CaSMa will participate in the 2nd Web We Want festival at London’s Southbank Centre. We will have a stand at the Interactive Market where we will present the work we are doing to develop and promote ethical social media research.

Activities at our stand will include:

  1. A presentation to raise awareness about social media analysis and the ways in which combined information from multiple sources can reveal more about you than might be immediately obvious from your social media activity.
  2. Information sheets about your fundamental rights to privacy and data protection.
  3. Brief interviews to survey your views and concerns about social media research and ethics of internet mediated research in general.

CaSMa_flyerCaSMa_rights_flyer

The ‘Web We Want’ festival is dedicated to the idea that the World Wide Web can empower people to bring about positive change both in their own life and in the lives of others. The festival is part of the activities of the Web We Want movement, a global movement to defend, claim and change the future of the Web. Videos from the the 1st Web We Want festival that took place in September (27 & 28), also at London’s Southbank Centre, are available here.

“The [Web We Want] campaign is responding to threats to the future of the Web with a practical and positive vision — unleashing the power of people from around the world to defend, claim and change a Web that is for everyone. [With the] aim to bring about real change at a national and global level.”

“[The Web We Want campaign] focus[es] on using innovative approaches to build support for national and regional campaigns to create a world where everyone, everywhere is online and able to participate in a free flow of knowledge, ideas, collaboration and creativity over the open Web.”

“The Web We Want campaign will amplify, connect and strengthen local groups, especially in the developing world, building a movement to empower citizens to make, claim and shape the Web they want both nationally and globally, so as to achieve the world we want. Rooted in the vision of the UN Declaration of Human Rights and the goals of social justice, we convene around five key principles:

  1. Freedom of expression online and offline
  2. Affordable access to a universally available communications platform
  3. Protection of personal user information and the right to communicate in private
  4. Diverse, decentralised and open infrastructure
  5. Neutral networks that don’t discriminate against content or users”

Psychological profiling for a shopping bargain

iBeacons

Comment on “Is sending shoppers ads by Bluetooth just a bit creepy?” in the Conversation.

Professor Angela Sasse and Dr Charlene Jennett, based at the UCL Interaction Centre (UCLIC), are interested in understanding how people interact with technology and in particular, the use of proximity ‘beacons’. iBeacon is one such indoor proximity system that can trigger actions on smart phones and other devices. This new technology has already been trialled in the retail sector to simplify payments and enable on-site offers and personalised adverts to customers. Whilst seemingly offering consumers a quicker and more streamlined shopping experience, the application of the technology also raises a number of ethical issues that require consideration.

Continue reading Psychological profiling for a shopping bargain