Tag Archives: Elvira Perez Vallejos

Launch of “The Internet on Our Own Terms” report

You are invited to join us for the launch of a groundbreaking report that articulates the voice of children and young people, and their relationship to the internet and digital technologies;

The Internet On Our Own Terms

How Children and Young People Deliberated about their Digital Rights

6 – 8pm
Tuesday 31st January 2017
Committee Room 3A
House of Lords
London, SW1A 0PW

Speakers;
Baroness Beeban Kidron, Prof. Stephen Coleman, Dr. Elvira Perez Vallejos and youth jurors, followed by a Q&A

In April 2015 young people aged between 12 and 17 gathered together in the cities of Leeds, London and Nottingham to participate in a series of jury-styled focus groups designed to ‘put the internet on trial’. In total, nine juries took place which included 108 young people, approximately 12 participants per jury.

The report outlines the ground-breaking research process, using actors to set scenarios for debate and a deliberative process to capture the changing views of young people as they examine a broad range of claims and evidence.

The policy suggestions, straight from the mouths and imaginations of the young participants, aimed at Ministers, Industry, Educators and Business are vibrant, surprising and pragmatic.
We hope you will join us to hear more

Announcement: 5Rights Youth Juries report launch at Parliament

The UnBias team is pleased to announce the launch of a ground-breaking report that articulates the voice of children and young people, and their relationship to the internet and digital technologies.

The launch will take place at the House of Lords next 31st of January and it be presented by Baroness Beeban Kidron, Prof Stephen Coleman from Leeds University and Elvira Perez from the UnBias team. Children and young people will be attending the launch and contributing the Q&A session.

Mural created at the Web We Want Festival

This report is titled ‘The Internet on our Own Term: How Children and Young People Deliberated about their Digital Rights’ and describes the work carried since April 2015 in which young people aged between 12 and 17 gathered together in the cities of Leeds, London and Nottingham to participate in a series of jury-styled focus groups designed to ‘put the internet on trial’. In total, nine juries took place which included 108 young people, approximately 12 participants per jury.

Continue reading Announcement: 5Rights Youth Juries report launch at Parliament

Submission to House of Lords inquiry on “Children and the Internet”

imagevaulthandler-aspxBuilding on the results from our work on the iRights Youth Juries, CaSMa responded to the call for evidence from the to House of Lords Communications Committee “Children and the Internet” inquiry. Following our submission at the end of August, Professor Derek McAuley was invited to give verbal evidence, which took place on October 11th [transcript] [video].

Continue reading Submission to House of Lords inquiry on “Children and the Internet”

When AI goes to War: youth opinion, modern conflict, and autonomous weapons

robot 2Weaponisation of artificial intelligence (AI) presents one of the greatest ethical and technological challenges in the 21st century and has been described as the third revolution in warfare, after the invention of gunpowder and nuclear weapons. Despite the vital importance of this development for modern society, legal and ethical practices, and technological turning point, there is little systematic study of public opinion on this critical issue. This interdisciplinary project addresses this gap. Our objective is to analyse what factors determine public attitudes towards the use of fully autonomous weapons. To do this, we put the public at the center of the policy debate, starting with youth engagement in political and decision-making processes.

Continue reading When AI goes to War: youth opinion, modern conflict, and autonomous weapons

Children’s and Young People’s Rights in the Digital Age: An IAMCR 2016 pre-conference

Are children’s rights being newly infringed or enhanced in the digital age? Such questions concern researchers, child rights’ advocates, and internet governance experts. Yet children’s needs and experiences in the digital age are often neglected in high-level debates about global internet provision and governance and children’s rights are treated as a minority interest and seen as demanding exceptional treatment from adult society. Further, current debates frequently emphasise the risks children potentially face online and underline their right to protection, but much less attention is gven to children’s provision and participation rights online.

The conference will foster an international debate on key issues related to children’s and young people’s rights in the digital age, including: child and youth participation rights; online opportunities and risks; inequalities and digital exclusion; policy and multi-stakeholder governance; the role of peers and peer culture; participatory research; e-learning, health promotion and creativity in the digital environment; cross-generational dynamics of online engagement.

The conference includes a plenary presentation from Global Kids Online. It will begin at midday on 26 July and close at midday on 27 July to enable delegates to make the journey to Leicester for the opening of IAMCR 2016 (approximately one-hour train journey).  For more details, visit the conference website.

Download the programme (PDF)

Download the original call for proposals (PDF)

Contemporary Political Youth Culture and Communication

Marking the launch of the Centre for Political Youth Culture and Communication (CPAC) this two-day international symposium explores the socio-cultural factors influencing the civic engagement of young people and its means of communicative expression. Young networking citizens in many parts of the world today play a crucial role in shaping the future prospects for democratic societies. The styles, nature and means of their political engagement is therefore of increasing importance to policy-makers and academics alike. This event is focused upon the communicative, emotional, embodied, and aesthetical modes of youth citizenship. It examines the social construction of the political identities of young people within the context of widening social inequality, climate change, reflexive individualism and a networked social media ecology.

The Voiceless Generation: What does youth civic engagement look like in the digital age?

This Youth Civic and Political Engagement Workshop forms part of a collaboration between Horizon’s CaSMa and Gada aimed at developing social media tools to support grass-roots driven civic engagement campaigns to achieve tangible policy impact.
The purpose of this workshop is to explore definitions and understanding around what youth civic engagement is (and also what is not), what motivates young people to engage and how to reach out to those whose voice is not being heard.
In order to address these questions we invited participants from:
  • City council
  • National parliament outreach
  • Regional & national civic NGOs
  • Political/activist student societies
  • Interested students
In preparation for the workshop participating groups were asked to prepare a short presentation on:
1. What do you do? (aspects of your professional role that may be relevant to youth civic engagement)
2. How do you seek to promote youth engagement?
3. What challenges do you face?

Event programme
10:30 – 11:00 Welcome, registration and opening survey
11:00 – 11:15 Ice-breaker
11:15 – 11:40 What do we understand by civic engagement?
Introductory Video
Aims and objectives of the event
What is civic engagement? Some background information
What is civic engagement? Examples from participants
Adopting a definition
11:40 – 12.10 Focus groups: motives, barriers and facilitators of     youth civic engagement
Breaking into focus groups and choosing rapporteurs
Focus group discuss key issues/questions
12:10 – 12:20 Coffee break
12:20 – 12:35 Rapporteurs present findings
12:35 – 12-55 Wrap-up session
Discussing the findings
What have we learnt?
What do we do next?
12:55 – 13:00 Closing survey
13:00 – 14:00 Lunch and networking at Trent Cafe

Young people’s dream internet

Internet Society

Yesterday was United Nations Day of Anti-Bullying, a day to recognize the epidemic of bullying and online abuse that seems to be rising according to recent surveys by YouGov/Vodafone.

Cyberbullying is becoming an alarming problem among children and young people, not only because of its links to mental health and well-being but because it is so widespread that is becoming to be considered a worse problem among teenagers than drug abuse.

Not all news are disheartening though…

Continue reading Young people’s dream internet

Academy of Social Sciences conference on Ethics and Social Media Research

A one-day conference dedicated to the topic of Ethics and Social Media Research, by the Academy of Social Science. #SoMeEthics.

Programme:
10:00 Registration and coffee – 7th floor
10:30 Keynote 1 – 3rd floor, seminar room 12
“The Ethical Disruptions of Social Media Research: tales from the field.” Professor Susan Halford, Director Web Science Institute, University of Southampton
11:30 Parallel Session 1 – 3rd floor
A: Ethical Practicalities (I) – seminar room 11
B: Blurred Lines – seminar room 12
C: Social Media Research Ethics: Sharing Best Practice – seminar room 13
1300 Lunch – 7th Floor
1400 Parallel Session 2 – 3rd floor
D: Critical Ethical Reflections – seminar room 11
E: Ethical Practicalities (II) – seminar room 12
F: Panel Session – seminar room 13
1530 Coffee
1600 Keynote 2 – 3rd floor, seminar room 12
“Where next for #SocialEthics?” Steven Ginnis and Harry Evans, Social Research Institute, Ipsos MORI
1700 Closing remarks
Followed by a Wine Reception, kindly sponsored by Sage Publishing – 7th floor