Tag Archives: Big Data

Digital Government Summit: Agile Policy Making

“It’s not about making existing things just a little bit better: it’s about completely rethinking what we do and how we do it.” Stephen Foreshew-Cain, Executive Director, Government Digital Service

Substantial change is underway across government and public services to transform the relationship between the citizen and the state. The goal is to make it easier for people to access the services they want, when and where they want, and to deal with government in a simple, secure and speedy way. We are in the digital age but is not just about new technology, big data or moving services online. It is about thinking in a completely different way. Being agile and flexible enough to implement service design as it forms, to test different versions of the same services and pick the winner at low cost, to have feedback and public consultation in real time. This event will explore how to build services that meet citizen’s needs and rethink policy making and service design so they are closely tied.

This summit of digital leaders will focus on how government and civil service is changing, both in the UK and across the world, and what the future might mean for national and local democracy, for policy making and implementation, and for data and information sharing. The agenda will explore how to make services simpler, clearer and faster for citizens and ensure your organisation has the right skills in place to make it happen.

Join us at the Digital Government Summit: Agile Policy Making to hear from the latest thinking, strategies and cutting-edge projects that are transforming how public services are being designed, commissioned and delivered on a national, regional and local level. You will learn what the future direction for government and the public sector is and how to transform your organisation to benefit from new innovations and new ways of working.

Programme overview is available here.

Policy Summit – What’s working to foster digital growth

We believe that the digital economy holds enormous opportunities for businesses and societies in Europe, but also poses challenges in areas such as job automation and the impact of the sharing economy. Readie’s Digital Policy Summit in partnership with the Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung takes place on 11 October in Berlin.

Together, delegates from national governments will share practical insights and investigate existing high-quality policies that have the potential to:

  • provide opportunities for entrepreneurs to start up new digital businesses;
  • enable existing businesses to scale using digital technology;
  • create digital growth across Europe which is inclusive and sustainable.

Data for Policy 2016: Frontiers of Data Science for Government – Ideas, Practices and Projections

Data Science is emerging as a key interdisciplinary research field to address major contemporary challenges across sectors. Particular focus on the government sector offers huge potentials to advance citizen services and collective decision-making processes. To reflect the diversity of skills and knowledge required to tackle challenges in this domain, the conference offers an open discussion forum for all stakeholders. We invite individual and/or group submissions from all relevant disciplines and application domains. Topics covered include but are not limited to the following:

  • Government & Policy: Digital era governance and citizen services, public demand vs. government response, using data in the policy process, open source and open data movements, policy laboratories, citizen expertise for government, public opinion and participation in democratic processes, distributed data bases and data streams, information and evidence in policy context, case studies and best practices.
  • Policy for Data & Management: Data collection, storage, and access; psychology/behaviour of decision; privacy, trust, public rights, free speech, ethics and law; data security/ownership/linkage; provenance, curation, expiration; private/public sector/non-profit collaboration and partnership, etc.
  • Data Analysis: Computational procedures for data collection, storage, and access; large-scale data processing, dealing with biased/imperfect/uncertain data, human interaction with data, statistical/computational models, technical challenges, communicating results, visualisation, etc.
  • Methodologies: Qualitative/quantitative/mixed methods, gaps in theory and practice, secondary data analysis, web scraping, randomised controlled trials, sentiment analysis, Bayesian approaches and graphical models, biologically inspired models, real-time and historical data processing, simulation and modeling, small area estimation, correlation & causality based models, and other relevant methods.
  • Data Sources: Government administrative data, official statistics, commercial and non-profit data, user-generated web content (blogs, wikis, discussion forums, posts, chats, tweets, podcasting, pins, digital images, video, audio files, advertisements, etc.), search engine data, data gathered by connected people and devices (e.g. wearable technology, mobile devices, Internet of Things), tracking data (including GPS/geolocation data, traffic and other transport sensor data, CCTV images etc.,), satellite and aerial imagery, and other relevant data sources.
  • Policy/Application Domains: Security, health, cities, public administration, economy, science and innovation, finance, energy, environment, social policy areas (education, migration, etc.) and other relevant domains.

Data for Policy 2016 Conference Programme is available here!

Privacy, Personality and Flows of Information

A workshop conference co-organised by the mandate of the Special Rapporteur for Privacy (SRP) together with Human Rights Watch, Global Freedom of Expression Columbia University, the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University Law Center, The Department of Information Policy & Governance at the University of Malta and Security, Technology & e-Privacy Research Group at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. This workshop is the first public event co-organised by the SRP aimed at achieving a better understanding of privacy.

Full information about the invitation to this event is available at the UN SRP’s blog. This also includes a link to the agenda of the workshop.

EuroDIG 2016

EuroDIG2016From June 8th to 10th we attended EuroDIG 2016, the annual Pan-European Dialogue on Internet Governance conference that was held in Brussels this year.

Continue reading EuroDIG 2016

EuroDIG 2016

The Pan-European dialogue on Internet governance (EuroDIG) is an open platform for informal and inclusive discussions on public policy issues related to Internet Governance (IG). 

Exchanging views and best practices

The European Dialogue on Internet Governance (EuroDIG) is an open multi-stakeholder platform to exchange views about the Internet and how it is governed. Created in 2008 by several organisations, government representatives and experts, it fosters dialogue and collaboration with the Internet community on public policy for the Internet. Culminating in an annual conference that takes place in a different capital city, EuroDIG ‘messages’ are prepared and presented to the UN-led Internet Governance Forum.

EuroDIG is supported by a group of institutional partners, namely the Council of Europe, the European Commission, the European Regional At-Large Organization (EURALO), the European Broadcasting Union (EBU), the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the Internet Society (ISOC), the Federal Office of Communications of Switzerland (OFCOM) and the Ré- seaux IP Européens Network Coordination Centre (RIPE NCC).

The main aim of EuroDIG is to promote the engagement of Europeans in multistakeholder dialogue in order to share their expertise and best practice and, where possible, identify common ground. This enables EuroDIG to pull together national perspectives and to apply and shape European values and views regarding the Internet.

The programme overview is available here.

#DASTS16 Interpellating Future(s), the biennale Danish conference on STS

“It could have been different” is the quintessential anti-determinist and anti-essentialist mantra of STS. This mantra is a simultaneous reflection on being and becoming, a concern with the past, present and the future. It is a mantra that implicates a care of the possible.

The concern with future(s) is unprecedented and ranges across all scales. Climate change; financial technologies – ‘futures’ – allowing investment on presumptions; and gene tests for diagnosing (the probability) of ailments to appear later in life, are but a few evident examples. Predicting, forecasting, foresighting future(s) is an inextricable part of the present and the role of science and technology in the production as well as the anticipation of the future(s), is paramount. Arguably for the first time in centuries the future looks gloomy, rather than bright.

A concern with future(s) is central to the field of STS. When future(s) are made – not given – as suggested above, how they are made becomes a central and painstaking concern. What constitutes the practices and sociotechnical arrangements of future making? What future(s) follows from our current arrangements, infrastructures and ways of engaging? What diagnosis of the present – what nature(s) – does specific future making practices rest upon? And when future(s) are not entirely up to us and escapes us continuously, how are we disposed? The DASTS 2016 conference committee invites the Danish STS research milieu to engage with the practices of future(s) and future making.

The conference committee invites participants, paper abstracts and track proposals concerned with, but not limited to, future(s). The spirit of the conference is as always inclusive and exploratory. The conference welcomes contributions from scholars at all academic levels that consider themselves affiliated with STS to share and discuss their work. DASTS 2016 is a biennial conference of the Danish Association for Science, Technology and Society Studies.

Thursday the 2nd

9:00-10:00 Registration
10:00-11:00 Keynote by Isabelle Stengers
11:00-12:30 Parallel sessions
Publics, politics and participation – Part I – Room 091
Introducing STS and social work – Part I – Room 184
Technologies of the self – Part I – Room 192
12:30-13:30 Lunch
13:30-14:30 DASTS General Assembly
14:30-14:45 Tea & Coffee
14:45-16:15 Parallel sessions
Fabricating STS – Room 091
Introducing STS and social work – Part II – Room 184
Technologies of the self – Part II – Room 192
17:00-19:00 Future Lecture by Bruno Latour (registration closed but livestreamed here)
19:30-? Conference dinner at FrüdNo16.

Friday the 3rd

9:30-10:30 Keynote by Nikolas Rose
10:30-12:00 Parallel sessions
Publics, politics and participation – Part II – Room 091
Dreams for the Future – Part I – Room 184
Exploring data driven governance assemblages – Part I – Room 192
12:00-13:00 Lunch
13:00-15:00 Parallel sessions
Research practices and knowledge creation – Room 091
Dreams for the Future – Part II – Room 184
Exploring data driven governance assemblages – Part II – Room 192
15:00-15:30 Tea & Coffee
15:30-16:59 Parallel sessions
Anticipation, Scenario Planning & STS – Room 091
Dreams for the Future – Part III – Room 184
Future Making – Room 192

What makes an algorithmic system trustworthy?

FairAlgosIn an age of ubiquitous data collecting, analysis and processing, what determines the trustworthiness and perceived ‘fairness’ of a system that heavily relies on algorithms?

Over the last couple of weeks, Facebook has repeatedly had to defend itself against criticism about the way in which it makes editorial decisions when selecting stories that will appear on its ‘Trending Topics’ and ‘News Feed’.

Continue reading What makes an algorithmic system trustworthy?

The Privatization of Human Rights: Illusions of Consent, Automation and Neutrality

CIGI_coverWhile exploring the Internet And Human Rights Resources Center at the Internet Society, I encountered a highly informative report from the Global Commission on Internet Governance (CIGI), which was published in January 2016, on the extent to which the management of individuals’ fundamental rights, e.g. privacy and free speech, is in the hands corporations.

The report presents an excellent overview of the various ways in which the dominance of a small set of companies that control the web platforms where most people spend the majority of their time online has produced a situation where these companies have become major actors in determining the state of human rights online.

Continue reading The Privatization of Human Rights: Illusions of Consent, Automation and Neutrality

Digital4EU stakeholder forum (summary)

digital4euOn 25th February 2016, the Digital4EU Stakeholder Forum, organized by the European Commission, took place in Brussels. This one day conference was centred on the progress made in creating a Digital Single Market in Europe. The agenda of the day started with a pre-conference breakfast session about the European Fund for Strategic Investment (EFSI)’s financing opportunities for digital projects, especially for extending the roll-out of Broadband internet connections in rural areas that have not yet achieved full internet penetration.

Continue reading Digital4EU stakeholder forum (summary)