Tag Archives: Ansgar Koene

Social Media in Research

Social Media in Research is a one day event taking a practical look at social media, new technologies and digital tools used by researchers, in research settings, across the whole research lifecycle. It will help researchers learn new skills, strengthen their academic profile, prepare for transition into a new area of work, broaden awareness regarding online identity and reputation management and share good practice in digital literacy.

Helping current users and non-users alike (that’s everyone from technophobes to those who’d like to learn new skills) and organised through a range of themes identified below, attend if you want to know more about:

  • Specific digital technologies and social media tools as they are being used in the research lifecycle
  • New ways of using digital media tools to build, support and promote for your research profile
  • How social media is used in different research contexts as well as important online ethics, identity and reputation management concerns
  • How to use digital media to communicate and disseminate research and maximise benefits from conference/event attendance
  • How digital tools can enable collaborative research opportunities and be used to mobilise stakeholders in the research process
  • How digital skills and social media for public, industry, funder government engagement and knowledge transfer
  • How researchers and academics use digital and social media tools across different research fields
  • Top tips for effective tool use and the pitfalls to avoid

Hear from speakers who will apply a research lens to social media use, from research leaders and digitally experienced practitioners including Professor Todd Landman, Hervé Morvan, Philip Moriarty and Pat Thomson, as well as non-expert users who have recently dipped their toe in the water and agreed to share their experience.

A range of demonstrations (10 minute shorts) will also offer researcher insights on everything from scholarly microblogging to using Profile Building tools.

Rebooting The Expert, Routes to Policy Impact

Having previously been postponed due to Pre-election period Prudah restriction, the “Rebooting the Expert”  a.k.a. “Routes to Policy Impact” event finally took place on July 6th 2017.

Continue reading Rebooting The Expert, Routes to Policy Impact

Nottingham Engaged: Rebooting ‘the Expert’?

The University of Nottingham public engagement and policy impact
conference

Thursday July 6 2017, Jubilee Conference Centre, Jubilee Campus

Agenda
Conference Chair: Alex Miles (Deputy Director for Communications and Advocacy)

0900-0930 Registration and Breakfast

0930-1030 What works in public and policy engagement?
Dr Jenni Chambers (Head of Public Engagement with Research – Research Councils UK)
Mel Knetsch (Strategic lead for Innovation and Interdisciplinarity – ESRC)
Professor Sir Martyn Poliakoff (Research Professor of Chemistry – University of Nottingham)
Dr Michael Scott (Associate Professor and Impact Officer – University of Warwick)
Chloe Sheppard (Researchers’ Engagement Manager – Wellcome Trust)

1030-1130 Nottingham experiences
A series of University of Nottingham academics and professional staff share their experience of policy and public engagement work in rapid-fire ‘pecha-kucha’ style presentations, followed by Q&A

1130-1145 Coffee Break

1145-1230 Rebooting the ‘expert’
Rick Hall (Founder – Ignite Futures Ltd)
Dom McDonald (Head of Education – The Royal Institution)
Sir Alan Meale (MP for Mansfield 1987-2017)
Farai Pfende (Head of Learning and Development – JoCo Learning and Development)
Dr Karen Salt (Co-Director, Centre for Research in Race and Rights – University of Nottingham)

1230-1330 Lunch

1330-1335 Developing impact leaders at Nottingham
Dr Lyndsey Harris (Assistant Professor in Criminology – University of Nottingham)

1335-1400 The future for Nottingham
Professor Dame Jessica Corner (Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research & Knowledge Exchange – University of Nottingham)

1400-1445 Breakout 1 (session options on next page)

1445-1530 Breakout 2 (session options on next page)

1530-1700 BBQ – Networking Opportunity & Doctoral Research Showcase

Breakout 1 – session options

Policy Engagement: where do I start? (Room 5)
Sarah Foxen (Parliamentary Office for Science & Technology)
Irena Hulova (Office of Alex Norris MP)
Professor Sarah Sharples (University of Nottingham)

Public Engagement: why bother? (Room 6)
Dr Jenni Chambers (RCUK)
Dr Susan Anderson (University of Nottingham)

Must do or wise to do? Writing impact and engagement into bids (Room 3)
Mel Knetsch (ESRC)
Dr Sara Goodacre (University of Nottingham)

Schools Engagement: why it matters and what you can do (Room 4)
Jon Rea (Nottingham City Council)
Professor Howard Stevenson (University of Nottingham)

Evaluating to make an impact (Room 2)
Dom McDonald (The Royal Institution)
Steven Hardy (University of Nottingham)

Breakout 2 – session options

Developing PE activity and pathways to impact (Room 6)
Dr Jenni Chambers (RCUK)
Dr Susan Anderson (University of Nottingham)

Presenting with impact: a practical session on public speaking and confidence (Room 5)
Martin Berry (award-winning director for theatre and radio)

Making the media work for you (Room 3)
Dr Denis Schluppeck (University of Nottingham)
Liz Cass (University of Nottingham)

Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology – web resources focus group (Room 4)
Sarah Foxen (Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology)

Participatory research: engaging communities in your projects (Room 2)
Dr Sarah Pierce (University of Nottingham)
Dr Karen Salt (University of Nottingham)

In the Conversation: “We asked young people what they want from the internet of the future – here’s what they said”

On March 21st the House of Lords Communications Committee inquiry on Children and the Internet published its report, which incorporated a number of findings that came out or our Youth Juries engagement with 13-17 years old ‘digital natives’.

Our publication in the Conversation summarizes the main points.

ISOC User Trust Webinar

In preparation for the European Chapters meeting (22-23 February 2017) we will have a 90 minutes Webinar / Conference call on Tuesday 14 February 2017 from 6pm to collect input from participants about the ways in which ISOC UK can/should engage with the theme of User Trust.

In June 2016 ISOC published a working paper “A policy framework for an open and trusted Internet” outlining the four interrelated dimension to be considered when developing policies for the internet. http://www.internetsociety.org/doc/policy-framework-open-and-trusted-internet

The aim of the European Chapters meeting is to build on this and identify specific areas related to User Trust that ISOC should prioritise and focus on when engaging with policy maker to build a trusted Internet.

The specific discussions around User Trust that have been proposed for the meeting are:

  • Ethical data handling
  • Privacy
  • Data breaches
  • Examples of collaborative security in action
  • Internet of Things – implications for security, privacy, control (who control which aspect of the device: user vs. service provider), liability in case of problems, longevity (e.g. devices embedded in infrastructure)
  • Digital Literacy – the need for people to understand basic aspects of how the internet, and digital services, work in order to: improve cybersecurity; be able to give informed consent to personal data usage; understand the implications of proposed legislation (e.g. snoopers charter); …
  • User generated content moderation – how to approach the issues related to fake news and editorial responsibility
  • An overview of the situation in Russia

Other areas of User Trust that might be especially relevant for ISOC UK could be:

  • Government surveillance powers (implications and legal challenges to the Investigative Powers Act)
  • The impact of nation-first, anti-globalization movement (Brexit)
  • Governance of the platform economy (e.g. Uber, Deliveroo), i.e. classification as ‘tech’ company to avoid regulations

Which areas should we prioritize? The chapters meeting is only one and a half days long so time is limited.

Looking beyond the European Chapters meeting, what kind of follow-up activities should ISOC UK pursue, e.g. digital literacy 101 for parliamentarians?

Topic: Internet Society UK and User Trust – Webinar
Time: Feb 14, 2017 6:00 PM London

Launch of “The Internet on Our Own Terms” report

You are invited to join us for the launch of a groundbreaking report that articulates the voice of children and young people, and their relationship to the internet and digital technologies;

The Internet On Our Own Terms

How Children and Young People Deliberated about their Digital Rights

6 – 8pm
Tuesday 31st January 2017
Committee Room 3A
House of Lords
London, SW1A 0PW

Speakers;
Baroness Beeban Kidron, Prof. Stephen Coleman, Dr. Elvira Perez Vallejos and youth jurors, followed by a Q&A

In April 2015 young people aged between 12 and 17 gathered together in the cities of Leeds, London and Nottingham to participate in a series of jury-styled focus groups designed to ‘put the internet on trial’. In total, nine juries took place which included 108 young people, approximately 12 participants per jury.

The report outlines the ground-breaking research process, using actors to set scenarios for debate and a deliberative process to capture the changing views of young people as they examine a broad range of claims and evidence.

The policy suggestions, straight from the mouths and imaginations of the young participants, aimed at Ministers, Industry, Educators and Business are vibrant, surprising and pragmatic.
We hope you will join us to hear more

Data Privacy Day 2017

January 28th was Data Privacy Day. With all the news and messages calling for your attention you may well have missed it since very few media organizations mentioned it this year. Here is a selection of activities that caught our eye:

Continue reading Data Privacy Day 2017

Responsible Governance for Healthy and Sustainable Smart Platforms: Policy directions for the collaborative economy

Smart online platforms will be a vital enabler of future economic growth across the EU and a key component of  the EU single digital market. They also promise new ways to pool and mobilise society’s resources with the potential to address various impending social and environmental crises.

However, to reap these benefits, new thinking is required around the regulation and governance of smart online platforms to ensure balanced interests, and to promote fair and safe forms of participation, particularly relating to the role played by algorithms and data in driving economies of scale.

This policy event will provide a forum to address the following questions:

  • What are the challenges and opportunities for public policy of Smart Online Platforms?
  • How can we leverage platforms for a more equal, just, and knowledgeable society?
  • How can platforms play a role in reducing the social divide and retain hard-won rights and protections?
  • What  are the challenges and opportunities for existing industries from their disruptive business models?
  • How should the regulatory environment change and what new regulatory institutions or instruments may be needed?
  • How can these technologies support public objectives and help policy makers deliver solutions at greater scale and of greater impact?

This event is being organised by the Smart Society EU FET project which has been exploring technologies and governance models for the next generation of Smart Platforms. The event will include the launch of the Smart Society Social Charter, and high-profile keynote talks.

Preliminary Agenda

 9.30 - 10.00 Registration

10.00 - 10.45 Keynote:The landscape of the collaborative economy, Helen Goulden (Nesta)

10.45 - 11.30 Keynote: Responsibility in Collaborative Economies (TBC)

11.30 - 12.00 Coffee

12.00 - 13.00 A Social Charter for Smart Platforms

13.00 - 13.30 Questions and Discussion

13.30 - 14.30 Lunch

14.30 - 15.15 Panel Session 

15.15 - 16.00 Closing plenary session

Digital Government Summit: Agile Policy Making

“It’s not about making existing things just a little bit better: it’s about completely rethinking what we do and how we do it.” Stephen Foreshew-Cain, Executive Director, Government Digital Service

Substantial change is underway across government and public services to transform the relationship between the citizen and the state. The goal is to make it easier for people to access the services they want, when and where they want, and to deal with government in a simple, secure and speedy way. We are in the digital age but is not just about new technology, big data or moving services online. It is about thinking in a completely different way. Being agile and flexible enough to implement service design as it forms, to test different versions of the same services and pick the winner at low cost, to have feedback and public consultation in real time. This event will explore how to build services that meet citizen’s needs and rethink policy making and service design so they are closely tied.

This summit of digital leaders will focus on how government and civil service is changing, both in the UK and across the world, and what the future might mean for national and local democracy, for policy making and implementation, and for data and information sharing. The agenda will explore how to make services simpler, clearer and faster for citizens and ensure your organisation has the right skills in place to make it happen.

Join us at the Digital Government Summit: Agile Policy Making to hear from the latest thinking, strategies and cutting-edge projects that are transforming how public services are being designed, commissioned and delivered on a national, regional and local level. You will learn what the future direction for government and the public sector is and how to transform your organisation to benefit from new innovations and new ways of working.

Programme overview is available here.

2016 UK Internet Governance Forum

2016 UK Internet Governance Forum

The programme for the 2016 UK-IGF, to be held on 17 November at One Drummond Gate, will include the sessions set out below. Further topics and speakers will be confirmed shortly and this page will be updated. In the meantime you can submit your views on what you would like to see discussed at the event. You can also keep up to date by following @UKIGF on Twitter.

If you are interested in attending, please sign up today.

Sessions

The global policy landscape

Former culture minister Rt Hon Ed Vaizey MP (@edvaizey) will give a short address on the changing global policy landscape.  What does the result of the US Presidential election and the increasingly assertive stances of Russia and China mean for the free and open internet?

Brexit: what next for UK internet policy?

Five months after the EU referendum, TechUK’s Charlotte Holloway (@CharlotteHollo) will lead a discussion on the practical and philosophical impacts of Brexit for the internet sector.  Can the UK maintain its influence on internet governance outside of the EU?

e-Identification: The future of privacy?

The rise of new forms of electronic identification potential offers improved security and easier access to public and private services. Access Partnership’s Matthew McDermott (@AccessAlerts) will be leading a workshop to consider how can we make sure these are secure and interoperable, and what might be the killer app to drive adoption?

What is the impact of the internet on political debate?

With political debate across the West apparently becoming more polarised, we will be asking has the internet empowered more people to engage in politics, widened our horizons, or simply made us more entrenched in our particular world-view?

A panel including NationBuilder’s Toni Cowan-Brown (@ToniCowanBrown) and Demos’ Carl Miller (@carljackmiller) will consider these questions and whether internet companies have a role to play in widening people’s exposure to other points of view?

The UK’s cyber-preparedness: In conversation with Anthony Finkelstein

With the number of high profile cyber-attacks targeting UK and international businesses rising on a weekly basis, we will hear from UCL’s Professor Anthony Finkelstein (@profserious) the UK’s Chief Scientific Adviser for National Security.

 Preparation for the global IGF

Global Partner Digital’s Andrew Puddephatt (@AndrewPuddephat) and the LSE’s David Souter (@DavidNSouter) will lead a round-up of the headlines from the day’s discussions and look ahead to the global IGF in December.

If you have any questions about the event or require any further information please contact info@ukigf.org.uk.