Category Archives: Social Media usage

Data Privacy Day 2017

January 28th was Data Privacy Day. With all the news and messages calling for your attention you may well have missed it since very few media organizations mentioned it this year. Here is a selection of activities that caught our eye:

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Announcement: 5Rights Youth Juries report launch at Parliament

The UnBias team is pleased to announce the launch of a ground-breaking report that articulates the voice of children and young people, and their relationship to the internet and digital technologies.

The launch will take place at the House of Lords next 31st of January and it be presented by Baroness Beeban Kidron, Prof Stephen Coleman from Leeds University and Elvira Perez from the UnBias team. Children and young people will be attending the launch and contributing the Q&A session.

Mural created at the Web We Want Festival

This report is titled ‘The Internet on our Own Term: How Children and Young People Deliberated about their Digital Rights’ and describes the work carried since April 2015 in which young people aged between 12 and 17 gathered together in the cities of Leeds, London and Nottingham to participate in a series of jury-styled focus groups designed to ‘put the internet on trial’. In total, nine juries took place which included 108 young people, approximately 12 participants per jury.

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Keeping Social Media – a new video from our colleagues at Digital Wildfires

Our colleagues on the Digital Wildfires project teamed up with Oxford Sparks and Jason R.C. Nurse to produce a new video animation for young people about the joys and challenges of social media information. In the words of the Digital Wildfires team: “Keeping Social Media depicts the ways that social media have revolutionised the ways we communicate. Whiles these platforms open up an unimagined volume of ideas and possibilities they also offer anonymity, which increases the chance that both children and adults may take risks and experiment with behaviours they may not consider offline. Our video describes how research can help find ways to tackle some of the challenges posed by social media and invites the viewer to consider how these digital social spaces should be regulated.”

Submission to House of Lords inquiry on “Children and the Internet”

imagevaulthandler-aspxBuilding on the results from our work on the iRights Youth Juries, CaSMa responded to the call for evidence from the to House of Lords Communications Committee “Children and the Internet” inquiry. Following our submission at the end of August, Professor Derek McAuley was invited to give verbal evidence, which took place on October 11th [transcript] [video].

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Social media, what is it good for (when used as part of your work)?

Twitter_communicationThe POET (Public Outreach Engagement Tool) project is currently running a second round of interviews to map out how academics at the University of Nottingham are using social media in the context of public engagement, especially in regards to the Impact and Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) agendas. We previously conducted one round of interviews with science researchers, and have held a workshop to think about what the output of this tool could look like. Our project is still at the stage where we are collecting information about how social media is used by academics as part of their working day – to what extent it is used, the feelings associated with using it, whether their motivations for using it are work related, and whether this tool would be useful for any current public engagement work.

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CaSMa presenting POET at Social Media & Society 2016

SMSociety_poster_logoThe Social Media & Society conference series has been bringing together social media researchers annually since 2010. This year’s meeting in London (UK) was the first time it was held outside of Canada.  For CaSMa this offered an excellent opportunity to present the results of the work Andrew Moffat at the Horizon CDT did for our POET project. Follow these links for more information about Andrew’s project, poster he presented at SM&S 16 and the report he wrote about his work.

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UnBias at DASTS16 Interpellating Futures

DASTS16On June 2nd and June 3rd the biennale Danish conference on STS (DASTS16) was held at Aarhus, Denmark. The tagline for the conference was the “quintessential anti-determinist and anti-essentialist mantra of STS ‘It could have been different'”.

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Human Rights and Technology. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

UPeaceThe United Nations mandated University for Peace (UPEACE) recently launched a call for papers to contribute to an e-book “that examines how the uses of current technologies, and the development of new ones, can contribute to guarantee and protect human rights within the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development framework. Hence, considering that every Sustainable Development Goal aims to protect one or more human rights, and that states will rely on the use of technological innovations and global interconnectedness to implement the 2030 Agenda, we are looking for articles that explore one or more of the following topics:

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The Privatization of Human Rights: Illusions of Consent, Automation and Neutrality

CIGI_coverWhile exploring the Internet And Human Rights Resources Center at the Internet Society, I encountered a highly informative report from the Global Commission on Internet Governance (CIGI), which was published in January 2016, on the extent to which the management of individuals’ fundamental rights, e.g. privacy and free speech, is in the hands corporations.

The report presents an excellent overview of the various ways in which the dominance of a small set of companies that control the web platforms where most people spend the majority of their time online has produced a situation where these companies have become major actors in determining the state of human rights online.

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