Category Archives: Children

Announcement: 5Rights Youth Juries report launch at Parliament

The UnBias team is pleased to announce the launch of a ground-breaking report that articulates the voice of children and young people, and their relationship to the internet and digital technologies.

The launch will take place at the House of Lords next 31st of January and it be presented by Baroness Beeban Kidron, Prof Stephen Coleman from Leeds University and Elvira Perez from the UnBias team. Children and young people will be attending the launch and contributing the Q&A session.

Mural created at the Web We Want Festival

This report is titled ‘The Internet on our Own Term: How Children and Young People Deliberated about their Digital Rights’ and describes the work carried since April 2015 in which young people aged between 12 and 17 gathered together in the cities of Leeds, London and Nottingham to participate in a series of jury-styled focus groups designed to ‘put the internet on trial’. In total, nine juries took place which included 108 young people, approximately 12 participants per jury.

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Submission to House of Lords inquiry on “Children and the Internet”

imagevaulthandler-aspxBuilding on the results from our work on the iRights Youth Juries, CaSMa responded to the call for evidence from the to House of Lords Communications Committee “Children and the Internet” inquiry. Following our submission at the end of August, Professor Derek McAuley was invited to give verbal evidence, which took place on October 11th [transcript] [video].

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Young people’s dream internet

Internet Society

Yesterday was United Nations Day of Anti-Bullying, a day to recognize the epidemic of bullying and online abuse that seems to be rising according to recent surveys by YouGov/Vodafone.

Cyberbullying is becoming an alarming problem among children and young people, not only because of its links to mental health and well-being but because it is so widespread that is becoming to be considered a worse problem among teenagers than drug abuse.

Not all news are disheartening though…

Continue reading Young people’s dream internet

General Data Protection Regulation: Implications for Children Digital Rights

According to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR,) information society services that wish to process any personal information related to a child under the age of 16 years will require parental/guardian consent. The GDPR is the European Commission’s tool that will unify data protection in the EU and there are plans for it to be adopted in 2018. In the most recent GDPR draft released by the European Council, the age limit where parental consent is mandatory has raised from 13 to 16 years. The implications for children digital rights are not well understood and, at the moment, nobody knows if this regulation will protect children or by the contrary make them more vulnerable. Something certain is that, until now, minimal consultation to incorporate the children voice has taken place and consequently, children’s digital rights are not being treated with the respect or seriousness they deserve.

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Guest post for Digital Wildfires: #TakeCareOfYourDigitalSelf

DigitalWildfiresYoung people are a highly vulnerable group on social media. Current research (summarised here https://www.nspcc.org.uk/services-and-resources/research-and-resources/2015/how-safe-are-our-children-2015/ ) suggests that 1 in 3 have been victims of cyber bullying and 1 in 4 have experienced something upsetting on a social media site. The ‘Digital Wildfire’ project (www.digitalwildfire.org) explores the spread of provocative and antagonistic content on social media and seeks to identify opportunities for the responsible governance of digital social spaces. As part of this we have spent time engaging with young people and school teachers to find out their views on social media and the harms it can cause.

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Digital Wildfires

CaSMa hosted, in collaboration with the Wildfires team, a workshop on how rumours, provocative content and (mis)information flows and goes viral on social media.

Baroness Beeban Kidron, Keynote speaker at the Digital Wildfires.
Baroness Beeban Kidron, Keynote speaker at the Digital Wildfires.

This is a serious problem which can lead to confrontation between freedom of information and societal safety. Self-regulation is a solution, however, how to promote self-regulation and awareness is the real challenge. Continue reading Digital Wildfires

Get educated…and Protect Your Children!

MonicaBlog_imageI approach the topic of young people’s rights on the internet not only as a researcher but as a mother. How will I inform and protect my children from the complex interactions young people experience online that lead to their mental health being affected?

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iRights Youth Juries

iReight_goup

On April 9th the first two iRights Youth Juries were held at University of Nottingham. In collaboration with the civil society initiative, iRights, and Prof. Coleman’s lab from University of Leeds, CaSMa will be running 12 Youth Juries to allow children and young people to have a say about their rights on the internet. At the Youth Juries groups of 10 to 15 participants, aged 12-17, are asked to consider, debate and share ideas about the future of the internet.

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Goodbye, Barbie?

Barbara Millicent Roberts, the world’s most professionally accredited and eclectically attired public figure, has been called many things in her 56 years of existence. Fake. Plastic. Too skinny. Too inept. Too toxic (literally). Even too tattooed. But surely the most hurtful comments for Barbie, as consumers across the world have come to know her, are suggestions that her plans for “eavesdropping” the conversations of millions  of chattering children have left her seeming just a little bit “creepy”.

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