All posts by Chris James Carter

Chris James Carter is a Research Associate with the CaSMa project, following his PhD candidacy at the Horizon Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT), University of Nottingham. With an academic background in Occupational Psychology, Chris’ primary research interests relate to digital identity and reputation management, with a specific focus on social psychological factors influencing how late adolescents and young adults manage professional reputational risk upon social media prior to, during, and following organisational entry. Chris has contributed articles that were subsequently published by The Conversation and Slate, co-produced the social media strategy for the Academy of Management Learning and Education (AMLE) journal and is co-training and development co-ordinator for the Organisational Psychology special interest group (SIG) of the British Academy of Management. As an avid social media user, you can find Chris on Twitter (@chriscarter83), Facebook and LinkedIn (/chrisjamescarter).

The credibility of online reviews: Fiverr-ing on the side of caution?

Amazon review "Gigs" on Fiverr.
Amazon review “Gigs” on Fiverr.

Scanning through the BBC’s online technology articles this week, I found my interest piqued by the news that Amazon have launched a lawsuit against 1,114 individuals offering review services in exchange for payment. The online marketplace site through which these users were operating, Fiverr, seemed oddly familiar and I soon realised why.

Continue reading The credibility of online reviews: Fiverr-ing on the side of caution?

An Affair to Remember?

Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr in “An Affair to Remember” (1957). Source: https://goo.gl/2vwUTs.

A mysterious online message reading, “Hey Noel, you can admit it’s real now” may be unlikely to immediately instil fear into many of us non-Noels. However, as of this afternoon, things have got more than a little uncomfortable for Avid Life Media’s CEO, Noel Biderman, and quite possibly 37.5 million other individuals across the world.

Continue reading An Affair to Remember?

Ethical Standards: Journalism vs Academics. Is it time for universal ethic guidelines?

This week, we are delighted to introduce a guest blog from our CaSMa intern, Levi Rickman! Levi is in the closing stages  of her Psychology degree at Nottingham Trent University, and is currently working with us on Phase II of the “Exploring Academic Attitudes to Social Media Research Ethics” project.

leviWhen I started my Internship with CaSMa a few weeks ago, I had a limited understanding of the ethical issues surrounding social media
research and, therefore, this was the main area for me to focus on. Having studied Psychology for five years, I have grown accustomed to the ethical guidelines that researchers must consider in order to have their projects approved by ethic committees, including informed consent, minimisation of potential harm to participants, and so on. These ethical issues can easily be dealt with when researching individuals in a laboratory setting, but pose a slightly more difficult challenge when trying to apply the same set of codes to research online, and particularly data produced on social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook.

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Digital Economy Web Science & Big Data Summer School

And now for something a little different…

I am very excited to announce that over the next few days I will be attending the Digital Economy Web Science & Big Data Summer School, held at the University of Southampton! In the words of the University’s Web Science Centre for Doctoral Training, here’s the rationale underpinning the event :

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Ansgar & Chris, in The Conversation this week!

What use would a digital bill of rights be?

Ansgar Koene, University of Nottingham and Chris James Carter, University of Nottingham

The Magna Carta, no relation to Chris.

The Liberal Democrats have been a lone voice among the parties calling for a digital bill of rights governing our growing use of the internet. But is it the right solution for the problem in hand?

Surveys suggest that the bill should pique the interest of at least a few floating voters, with almost three-quarters of British adults in one survey concerned over unauthorised access to their private information online.

Continue reading Ansgar & Chris, in The Conversation this week!

Goodbye, Barbie?

Barbara Millicent Roberts, the world’s most professionally accredited and eclectically attired public figure, has been called many things in her 56 years of existence. Fake. Plastic. Too skinny. Too inept. Too toxic (literally). Even too tattooed. But surely the most hurtful comments for Barbie, as consumers across the world have come to know her, are suggestions that her plans for “eavesdropping” the conversations of millions  of chattering children have left her seeming just a little bit “creepy”.

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From Social Media Research, to Researchers & Social Media

IMG_0182This week saw a slight shift in focus for one member of the CaSMa team, as Chris went out to speak to doctoral students about how social media can be used not only as a promising site for academic research, but to raise the profile of their work and professional reputation as researchers.

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What concerns do citizens have about the use of their social media data?

As we reported back in November 2014, the CaSMa Research team visited the Web We Want Festival hosted at the London South Bank Centre on the 28th to 30th of the month, and are very excited to share with you some of the fascinating insights offered across the weekend!

Continue reading What concerns do citizens have about the use of their social media data?

Students & perspectives on privacy: it’s a jungle out there

Computers in the Wild?
Computers in the Wild?

In this week’s CaSMa blog entry I’d like to share with you my experience of a recent student workshop session that focused on perspectives and theories of privacy, designed, delivered and kindly approved for discussion in this post by Dr Dario Landa-Silva, Associate Professor in the University of Nottingham’s School of Computer Science.

Continue reading Students & perspectives on privacy: it’s a jungle out there